America’s rusting nuclear arsenal: Behind the blast doors at USAF bases that reveal aging weapons and low morale of missile crews

Unarmed U.S. Air Force LGM-30G Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile launches during an operational test at Vandenberg Air Force Base - Public Domain

The nuclear missiles hidden in plain view across the prairies of northwest North Dakota reveal one reason why trouble keeps finding the nuclear Air Force. The ‘Big Sticks,’ as some call the 60-foot (18-meter)-tall Minuteman 3 missiles, are just plain old.

The Air Force asserts with pride that the missile system, more than 40 years old and designed during the Cold War to counter the now-defunct Soviet Union, is safe and secure. None has ever been used in combat or launched accidentally.

But it also admits to fraying at the edges: time-worn command posts, corroded launch silos, failing support equipment and an emergency-response helicopter fleet so antiquated that a replacement was deemed ‘critical’ years ago.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

***If you are a news addict, be sure to bookmark The Most Important News and visit on a daily basis for the very best breaking news, articles and videos from all over the Internet!***