creation evolution

Believing in beneficial mutations is like believing a short-circuit in the motherboard of your computer could improve its performance. To make any lasting change, a beneficial mutation would have to spread (“sweep”) through a population and stay (become “fixed”). To evolutionists, this idea has been essential for so long that it is called a “classic sweep”, “in which a new, strongly beneficial mutation increases in frequency to fixation in the population.” Some evolutionist researchers went looking for classic sweeps in humans, and reported their findings in the journal Science. “To evaluate the importance of classic sweeps in shaping human diversity, we analyzed resequencing data for 179 human genomes from four populations”. “In humans, the effects of sweeps are expected to persist for approximately 10,000 generations or about 250,000 years.” Evolutionists had identified “more than 2000 genes as potential targets of positive selection in the human genome”, and they expected that “diversity patterns in about 10% of the human genome have been affected by linkage to recent sweeps.” So what did they find? “In contrast to expectation,” their test detected nothing, but they could not quite bring themselves to say it. They said there was a “paucity of classic sweeps revealed by our findings”. Sweeps “were too infrequent within the past 250,000 years to have had discernible effects on genomic diversity.” “Classic sweeps were not a dominant mode of human adaptation over the past 250,000 years.”

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