An 11-Year-Old Girl With Terminal Stage Four Bone Cancer Was Just Named Prom Queen At A School In Ohio

This is one of the saddest, yet happiest, stories that I have written about in a long time. Only about 12,000 people live in the little town of Monroe, Ohio but a remarkable 11-year-old girl that lives there is capturing hearts all over the nation. Madison “Maddie” Smallwood has been battling bone cancer for several years, and the long-term prognosis does not look promising. Facing that kind of challenge would be way too much for many young girls her age, but not for Madison. She has decided that she is going to live life to the fullest no matter how long she has. So she has made a “bucket list” and is trying to complete as many items on it as she can while she still has time. And no matter how her story ultimately plays out, she will always be remembered as a warrior that was an inspiration to millions of Americans.

What One Husband Is Doing For His Wife During Her Excruciating Battle With Cancer Will Bring A Tear To Your Eye

How far would you go to support someone that you love during a life or death battle with cancer? What one husband decided to do while his wife was in a period of strict isolation during her radiation treatment is going viral all over the Internet. Last October, Marci Newman was diagnosed with thyroid cancer, and anyone that has ever had thyroid cancer can tell you how excruciating the treatments can be. She was forced to spend last week in isolation in her bedroom due to another round of radiation treatment, and her husband Jon decided to show his support by setting up a desk right outside of the door to her room. Their 17-year-old daughter MacKenna was so touched by this gesture that she posted a photograph of her father sitting at this desk on Twitter along with the following message…

Cancer Cure Discovered?: Australian Scientists Claim ‘Cancer Cells Simply Melt Away’

Cancer patients are finally catching a break, as Australian researchers have tested a miracle drug that leads to big improvement in a majority of cases, and total recovery in some. The drug targets a specific protein that helps cancer cells survive.

The Melbourne-based trial took place over four years and tested 116 patients. It was shown by researchers at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre that the drug Venetoclax can greatly reduce cancer blood cells.