The Next Katrina? Laura Is Experiencing “Rapid Intensification” And Will Likely Make Landfall As “A Major Hurricane”

We need to keep a very close eye on this new “monster storm” that is brewing in the Gulf of Mexico.  Laura was officially declared to be a hurricane on Tuesday morning, and at this moment it is projected to make landfall along the Gulf Coast on either late Wednesday or early Thursday.  But before it does, it is expected to undergo a process known as “rapid intensification”, and that just happens to be the exact same process that Hurricane Katrina went through just before it absolutely devastated the city of New Orleans in 2005.  After undergoing “rapid intensification”, meteorologists are expecting Hurricane Laura to come ashore as a category 3 storm with winds “of around 115 mph”

Hurricane Laura will make landfall as a major hurricane, with winds of around 115 mph and a storm surge up to 13 feet, when it strikes near the Louisiana-Texas border late Wednesday or early Thursday, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The storm surge estimates are “staggering amounts, life-threatening amounts,” NHC Director Ken Graham said.

At this point, hundreds of thousands of people living along the Gulf Coast have already been evacuated, and we are being told that this storm could cause “devastating damage” to coastal communities…

Laura is expected to become a Category 3 storm, which routinely cause “devastating damage” to homes, trees and infrastructure, according to the National Weather Service. Recent Category 3 storms include Harvey, which hit Texas in 2017, and Rita, which hit Louisiana in 2005.

When Hurricane Katrina made landfall in 2005, it was also a category 3 storm with top winds of approximately 125 mph.

So if current forecasts are accurate, Laura will be a slightly less powerful storm than Katrina was.

But the truth is that we don’t really know for sure what will happen.

Rapid intensification is a highly unpredictable process, and Laura is heading directly into conditions that are extremely favorable

“The conditions ahead of Laura do favor rapid intensification,” University of Miami researcher Brian McNoldy said.

The phenomenon is typically defined to be a tropical cyclone intensifying by at least 35 mph in a 24-hour period, according to Colorado State University meteorologist Phil Klotzbach.

Hurricanes love warm water, and it is being reported that Laura will be hovering above waters that are very warm for this time of the year

Seawater in the Gulf is plenty warm, forecasters said, in the neighborhood of 86-88 degrees, according to meteorologist Jeff Masters of Yale Climate Connections. Laura “will have a long stretch of warm waters with high heat content Tuesday night until landfall Wednesday night or Thursday morning, and rapid intensification during that time is a good possibility,” Masters said.

So there is really no telling how powerful Laura could become.

But even if it just ends up being about as powerful as Katrina, it is a storm that you won’t want to mess with.  For those that may not remember, Katrina was one of the worst natural disasters in all of U.S. history.  The following comes from Wikipedia

Flooding, caused largely as a result of fatal engineering flaws in the flood protection system known as levees[4] around the city of New Orleans, precipitated most of the loss of lives.[5] Eventually, 80% of the city, as well as large tracts of neighboring parishes, were inundated for weeks.[6] The flooding also destroyed most of New Orleans’ transportation and communication facilities, leaving tens of thousands of people who had not evacuated the city prior to landfall stranded with little access to food, shelter or basic necessities. The scale of the disaster in New Orleans provoked massive national and international response efforts; federal, local and private rescue operations evacuated displaced persons out of the city over the following weeks.

To this day, there are some parts of New Orleans that have never recovered from that storm.

The good news is that the current forecast track has Laura going past New Orleans and primarily hitting areas along the border between Texas and Louisiana

On the forecast track, the center of Laura will move across the northwestern Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday. The hurricane should approach the upper Texas and southwest Louisiana coasts on Wednesday evening and move inland near those areas Wednesday night or Thursday morning.

But of course anything could still happen.

Hurricanes often make very unexpected twists and turns, and we have seen frequent examples of this in recent years.

So nobody along the Gulf Coast should be relaxing just yet.

And the truth is that there are going to be some communities that are going to be absolutely devastated after taking a direct hit from this storm.  We just don’t know which communities they will be at this point.

Unlike the pandemic that we are going through, the horrifying economic collapse that we are experiencing and the civil unrest that is raging in our major cities, this is just a temporary crisis.  This storm will soon pass, but more are coming.  September is a key month for hurricanes, and I will be watching developments over the coming weeks with great interest.

And we appear to have entered a time when storms are becoming more powerful and global weather patterns are going absolutely nuts all over the globe.  2020 has already been a banner year for natural disasters, and many believe that the years ahead will be even worse.

But for the moment, the eyes of the meteorological community are all on Hurricane Laura.  At this hour they are telling us that it could be a similar storm to Hurricane Katrina in many ways when it finally makes landfall, and that should deeply alarm all of us.

***Michael’s new book entitled “Lost Prophecies Of The Future Of America” is now available in paperback and for the Kindle on Amazon.com.***

About the Author: My name is Michael Snyder and my brand new book entitled “Lost Prophecies Of The Future Of America” is now available on Amazon.com.  By purchasing the book you help to support the work that my wife and I are doing, and by giving it to others you help to multiply the impact that we are having on people all over the globe.  I have published thousands of articles on The Economic Collapse BlogEnd Of The American Dream and The Most Important News, and the articles that I publish on those sites are republished on dozens of other prominent websites all over the globe.  I always freely and happily allow others to republish my articles on their own websites, but I also ask that they include this “About the Author” section with each article.  In addition to my new book, I have written four others that are available on Amazon.com including The Beginning Of The EndGet Prepared Now, and Living A Life That Really Matters. (#CommissionsEarned)  The material contained in this article is for general information purposes only, and readers should consult licensed professionals before making any legal, business, financial or health decisions.  I encourage you to follow me on social media on Facebook and Twitter, and any way that you can share these articles with others is a great help.  During these very challenging times, people will need hope more than ever before, and it is our goal to share the gospel of Jesus Christ with as many people as we possibly can.

Is California About To Get Hit By A Hurricane For The Very First Time In U.S. History?

In the entire history of our country, a hurricane has never made landfall in the state of California. So if such a thing actually happened, it would be considered to be an extremely unusual event. Well, right now there are three very dangerous tropical storms swirling in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Tropical Storm Kiko is not expected to be a serious threat to make landfall, but Tropical Storm Lorena and Tropical Storm Mario “are expected to become hurricanes by Friday as they approach the Mexican coast”. Tropical Storm Lorena is the more immediate threat, and the latest forecast is projecting that it will reach Mexico’s Baja California Peninsula by Saturday. If it maintains hurricane strength and continues to ride up the west coast, it is entirely possible that we could see something that we have never seen before. Most forecasters don’t want to talk too much about it yet, because it truly would be an unprecedented event, but there really is a chance that California could get hit by a hurricane for the very first time in U.S. history.

Let’s back up a bit and take a look at the bigger picture. According to USA Today, a record-tying six named storms are being tracked by meteorologists right now, and three of those are in the eastern Pacific…

Sure, it’s the middle of hurricane season. But this is ridiculous.

The six named storms whirling at once this week in the Atlantic and Pacific set a record, forecasters reported.

“While Humberto and Kiko were spinning in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific, four new tropical cyclones formed Tuesday: Imelda and Jerry in the Atlantic Basin, and Mario and Lorena in the Eastern Pacific Basin,” the Weather Channel reported.

Tropical Storm Lorena is expected to become a hurricane shortly, and according to the Weather Channel hurricane warnings have already been issued for much of the Baja California Peninsula…

A hurricane warning has been posted on the Baja California Peninsula from La Paz to Santa Fe, Mexico. This means hurricane-force winds (74-plus mph) are expected somewhere within the warning area – in this case, within the next 24 hours. Preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to completion.

The projected track of the storm will take it very close to southern California, but that does not necessarily mean that it will make landfall. So many things could still happen, and as we have seen in recent weeks, forecasting the behavior of hurricanes is not an exact science.

But if Lorena or Mario does make landfall along the California coastline, it will truly be a historic event. According to NASA, there has never been a documented case of a hurricane making landfall in the state…

While there has never been a documented case of a hurricane making landfall in California, the Golden State has had its share of run-ins and close calls with tropical cyclones. In fact, California has been affected by at least a few tropical cyclones in every decade since 1900. Over that timeframe, three of those storms brought gale-force winds to California: an unnamed California tropical storm in 1939, Kathleen in 1976 and Nora in 1997. But the primary threat from California tropical cyclones isn’t winds or storm surge. It’s rainfall — sometimes torrential — which has led to flooding, damage and, occasionally, casualties.

So we are talking about something that would be considered to be an extremely strange event.

The primary reason why hurricanes usually never make landfall in California is because the water off of the California coast is usually quite cold. The following comes from Wikipedia

Tropical cyclones usually require very warm water to depth, generally above 26.5 °C (80 °F) extending to a depth of 50 meters (160 ft).[1] However, the waters off California are cold even in summer. They rarely rise above 24 °C (75 °F) in near-shore southern California,[2] and usually remain below 17 °C (63 °F) along most of the rest of the coast and outer coastal waters, although El Niño events may warm the waters somewhat. This is due primarily to the extensive upwelling of colder sub-surface waters caused by the prevailing northwesterly winds acting through the Ekman Effect. The winds drive surface water to the right of the wind flow, that is offshore, which draws water up from below to replace it. The upwelling further cools the already cool California Current which runs north to south along coastal California and even much of coastal Baja California.

But right now a “strange anomaly” has caused water temperatures in the region to heat up dramatically. The following comes from an article that I published earlier this month

It is being called “the Pacific marine heatwave of 2019”, and officials are warning that it could have very frightening implications if it does not dissipate soon. Right now, there is a vast expanse of water stretching from northern Alaska all the way to southern California where the water temperatures have rapidly risen to very dangerous levels. In fact, in some spots the water temperature is already “as much as 6 degrees Fahrenheit above normal”, and there is a tremendous amount of concern about what will happen if the water continues to become even warmer. At this point things are already so bad that we are being warned that this strange anomaly could “ravage marine life and decimate commercial fishing” all along the west coast.

This means that conditions along the west coast of the United States are now quite favorable for major storms, and it makes it much less likely that Lorena and Mario will quickly fizzle out once they track farther north.

And if either Lorena or Mario does make landfall in California, many will consider that to be a really, really troubling sign.

Let’s review what we know at this hour.

We know that Tropical Storm Lorena and Tropical Storm Mario are both expected to become hurricanes very shortly, and we know that Lorena and Mario are both tracking north along the Mexican coast toward California.

And we also know that water temperatures along the California coast are much, much higher than normal right now, thus creating exceedingly favorable conditions for storms such as Lorena and Mario.

That doesn’t mean that either of them will make landfall in California, but it does mean that we should be watching these storms very carefully over the next several days.

Get Prepared NowAbout the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally-syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including Get Prepared Now, The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters. His articles are originally published on The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News. From there, his articles are republished on dozens of other prominent websites. If you would like to republish his articles, please feel free to do so. The more people that see this information the better, and we need to wake more people up while there is still time.

Hurricane Dorian Has Regained Strength And Is Reportedly “On A Collision Course With The Carolinas”

Are the Carolinas about to take a direct hit from Hurricane Dorian? As you will see below, that is what some mainstream media reports appear to indicate, but the truth is much more nuanced than that. Yes, Dorian is definitely heading toward the Carolinas, and without a doubt there is a possibility that it could make landfall along the coast, but there is no guarantee that this will happen. Meteorologists are telling us that Dorian will eventually be pushed out of danger to the north and east, but that may not happen in time to spare many coastal communities in both North and South Carolina. And let there be no mistake – this remains an exceedingly dangerous storm. In fact, in recent hours the storm has regained strength and has become even larger

Stronger and a little larger, Hurricane Dorian is gradually leaving Florida behind, setting its sights on the coasts of Georgia and the Carolinas. These areas face a triple threat of “destructive winds, flooding rains, and life-threatening storm surges,” according to the National Hurricane Center.

We actually do not know if Dorian will make landfall in the Carolinas at this point, but after reading some mainstream articles you would be tempted to think that is precisely what is going to happen. For example, the following comes from USA Today

Hurricane Dorian swept past Florida on Wednesday on a collision course with the Carolinas, claiming its first life in the U.S. and promising heavy rains, powerful winds and damaging surge.

That certainly makes it sound like the Carolinas are definitely going to take a direct hit from this storm, right?

But the latest official forecast makes it very clear that things could go either way. The following comes to us from the NOAA

At 800 PM EDT (0000 UTC), the large eye of Hurricane Dorian was located near latitude 30.9 North, longitude 79.8 West. Dorian is moving northward near 8 mph (13 km/h). A turn to the north-northeast is anticipated on Thursday, with a turn toward the northeast on Thursday night. A northeastward motion at a faster forward speed is forecast on Friday. On the forecast track, the center of Dorian will continue to approach the coast of South Carolina tonight, move near or over the coast of South Carolina on Thursday, and then move near or over the coast of North Carolina Thursday night and Friday.

But whether this storm officially makes landfall or not, the storm surge that will be created will certainly be immense.

And even though it is no longer a Category 5 storm, Dorian is still capable of “pushing vast amounts of water” because of how absolutely enormous it is…

Now that Dorian is starting to accelerate northward, the storm surge threat to the vulnerable Southeast U.S. coast will increase. Dorian’s enlarged circulation is pushing vast amounts of water, so the surge will be larger than one might assume from Dorian’s decrease from Category 5 to Category 2 strength. Hurricanes such as Ike (2008) and Sandy (2012) produced massively destructive surge long after their peak winds decreased and their circulations expanded.

So those along the Carolina coastline that are not taking this storm seriously are in desperate need of a reality check.

According to Fox News, some of the waves could be up to 37 feet high.

More than a million people along the east coast have been ordered to evacuate, and North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper is strongly urging those in the danger zone to obey those orders

“Leave now if you are in an area where an evacuation has been ordered,” North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper urged. “It is not worth putting your life – or the life of first responders – at risk.”

Cooper said an 85-year-old man fell to his death from a ladder while preparing his Columbus County home for the storm. At least 20 deaths in the Bahamas have been linked to Dorian.

In life, timing can be everything, and if you are in the wrong place at the wrong time it can literally cost you your life.

By the beginning of next week communities along the Carolina coastline will be completely out of danger, but over the next couple of days we could potentially see some needless deaths because certain people stubbornly refused to evacuate.

If you don’t believe that the danger is real, perhaps you need to read more about what this storm just did to the Bahamas

The extent of Dorian’s destruction across the Northern Bahamas is immense. As seen from the air over Abaco Island, the damage stretches for miles.

Entire neighborhoods are flattened, homes shredded, shipping containers and boats hurled inland. Some airports now look more like lakes. The terminal of one airport is now shrouded in debris.

Yes, Dorian is no longer a Category 5 storm, but neither was Hurricane Katrina when it hit New Orleans.

In fact, Hurricane Katrina was only a Category 3 storm when it finally made landfall.

We should be thankful that a “worst case scenario” for this storm never materialized, because what happened to the Bahamas could have very easily happened to us. It was the worst natural disaster that those islands have ever seen, and the recovery process is going to be measured in years.

By Saturday the danger should be gone, but authorities are watching several more potentially dangerous storms right now. Hurricane season does not end until November 30th, and so we are definitely not out of the woods yet.

Global weather patterns have definitely been behaving very strangely all year long, and we could most certainly see even more surprises in the weeks ahead.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally-syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including Get Prepared Now, The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters. His articles are originally published on The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News. From there, his articles are republished on dozens of other prominent websites. If you would like to republish his articles, please feel free to do so. The more people that see this information the better, and we need to wake more people up while there is still time.

New Forecast: Hurricane Dorian Is Going To Absolutely Hammer The East Coast All Week Long

This is the worst natural disaster that the Bahamas have ever seen. For hour after hour, Hurricane Dorian has remained almost stationary over the islands, and the devastation is immense. Power poles are being snapped like twigs, vehicles are being tossed about like toys, and thousands upon thousands of homes have already been destroyed. The good news is that Dorian is now just a Category 4 storm, but the bad news is that it will continue to move at a “glacial pace” for the rest of this week. Bands of heavy rain are already pummeling Florida, and the storm is going to slowly crawl up the east coast in the coming days. In fact, according to the latest projection the storm will still be south of Washington D.C. on Friday afternoon.

And remember, this is just a forecast. If the track of the storm deviates to the left just a little bit, Hurricane Dorian will actually make landfall somewhere along the east coast. The following is an excerpt from the update that the National Hurricane Center just released

Dorian remains nearly stationary just north of Grand Bahama Island. A slow west-northwestward motion is expected to resume overnight and continue into early Tuesday. A turn toward the northwest is forecast by late Tuesday, with a northeastward motion forecast to begin by Wednesday night. On this track, the core of extremely dangerous Hurricane Dorian will continue to pound Grand Bahama Island into Tuesday morning. The hurricane will then move dangerously close to the Florida east coast late Tuesday through Wednesday evening and then move dangerously close to the Georgia and South Carolina coasts on Wednesday night and Thursday.

But even if the eye never makes landfall, this storm will still have a tremendous impact on communities all along the east coast over the course of this upcoming week.

In fact, evacuation orders were just issued for a million more people

The governors of South Carolina and Georgia ordered at least 1 million people to evacuate their coasts beginning Monday after Hurricane Dorian left devastation in the northwest Bahamas and headed for the U.S. East Coast.

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster and Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp both announced mandatory evacuation orders to take effect at noon Monday in advance of the slow-moving, Category 5 hurricane.

In addition, it is being reported that more than 1,200 flights were canceled on Monday alone

Airlines have canceled about 1,275 Monday flights within, into, or out of the United States because of Hurricane Dorian as of 4:30 p.m. Eastern, according to flight tracker FlightAware.

Florida airports account for the bulk of the cancellations, with Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport topping the list after the airportannounced plans to close at noon Monday. According to FlightAware, there are 548 flight cancellations to and from Fort Lauderdale, home to big operations for Southwest, Spirit and JetBlue.

Even though wind speeds have diminished a bit, Dorian remains an extremely dangerous Category 4 hurricane, and everyone should be taking it very seriously.

Just look at what is happening in the Bahamas right now. According to the Daily Mail, the main airport is currently “under five feet of water”…

In the Bahamas, Dorian brought gusts of 225mph and up to 30 inches of rainfall on Sunday, wrecked 13,000 homes, tore down power lines and left Grand Bahama International Airport in Freeport under five feet of water by Monday morning. Experts have also warned of a possible storm surge that could send destructive waves crashing into the coast.

Dorian is the second-strongest Atlantic storm on record, and the joint-strongest ever to make landfall, after it barreled into the Bahamas with wind speeds of 185mph on Sunday.

Of course the Bahamas have seen many hurricanes before, but in all this time there has never been a storm quite like this

Before Dorian, its worst storm was the 1932 Bahamas hurricane, which passed by with 160 mph winds as a Category 5. Hurricane Andrew in 1992 also passed just south of Dorian’s Bahamian landfall zone but wasn’t nearly as strong as Dorian.

Thousands of homes have literally been swallowed by rising water, and even residences that are 20 to 25 feet above sea level were in danger of being engulfed.

Many local residents were not able to escape the flooding, and that included an 8-year-old boy that was the very first reported fatality from the storm.

In the end, the total death toll is likely to be quite high, but that isn’t stopping some idiots from going out in the middle of the storm and trying to perfrom ridiculous stunts for social media

Several videos posted on social media have shown people in the Bahamas braving the dangerous conditions during the Category 5 hurricane.

One man shared a clip of himself battling strong winds and being soaked by rain, saying he was 80 miles away from the eye and yet still dealing with awful weather.

While footage thought to have been filmed in Marsh Harbour, Nassau, the Bahamas, showed a man trying to navigate a small boat in the choppy waters.

The east coast is the next target for Dorian, and meteorologists are telling us that it will be pummeling the coastline all week long.

And this could potentially just be the beginning, because at this point the National Hurricane Center is tracking four more storms

As Hurricane Dorian approaches Florida, the National Hurricane Center is keeping track of four potential tropical systems that could become the next tropical depression and possibly Tropical Storm Fernand.

As of 8 a.m. Monday, the most likely candidate is a tropical wave that formed off Africa that was first investigated on Friday is now located 300 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands. It’s moving northwest across the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean, the hurricane center said.

So if you live in the Southeast, continue to get prepared, because it looks like this could definitely be “a September to remember”.

We live at a time when hurricanes are getting bigger and more powerful than ever before, and scientists tell us that it is just a matter of time before a disaster even worse than Hurricane Katrina happens.

Let us pray that such a disaster is put off for as long as possible, and let us also be in prayer for those in the Bahamas that are suffering so much right now.

Get Prepared NowAbout the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally-syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including Get Prepared Now, The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters. His articles are originally published on The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News. From there, his articles are republished on dozens of other prominent websites. If you would like to republish his articles, please feel free to do so. The more people that see this information the better, and we need to wake more people up while there is still time.

A Category 6 Storm? If The Scale Went That High, Hurricane Dorian Would Be One

Hurricane Dorian is already setting all sorts of records, and it hasn’t even reached the United States yet. As I write this article, this “lawnmower from the sky” is ripping through the Bahamas with immense fury. The east coast could potentially be the next target, and widespread evacuations have already been ordered all along the Florida coastline, and that even includes President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort. For many years, there has been a tremendous amount of debate in the scientific community about whether we should add a new category to the Saffir Simpson scale because of how powerful hurricanes are becoming. Many meteorologists have advocated adding a “Category 6” or even a “Category 7” to the scale, and without a doubt the power of Hurricane Dorian will almost certainly renew that debate. And as you will see below, if the scale had already been expanded, Hurricane Dorian would likely be considered to be a “Category 6” storm right now.

Let’s start with what we already know. According to the latest information from the National Hurricane Center, Hurricane Dorian currently has maximum sustained winds of 185 miles per hour…

LOCATION...26.6N 77.3W
ABOUT 95 MI...150 KM E OF FREEPORT GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND
ABOUT 175 MI...280 KM E OF WEST PALM BEACH FLORIDA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...185 MPH...295 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...W OR 270 DEGREES AT 5 MPH...7 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...910 MB...26.88 INCHES

We are also being told that wind gusts “exceeding 220 mph” have been detected, and at this point Dorian has already become far more powerful than most of the models were anticipating.

So how does this storm stack up against some of the other monster storms in recent history?

Well, according to Weather Underground, Dorian has already tied the all-time record for “strongest landfalling Atlantic hurricane”…

Dorian is now tied for having the second-highest winds of any Atlantic hurricanes on record:

1. 190 mph (Allen 1980)
2. 185 mph (Dorian 2019, Labor Day 1935, Gilbert 1988, Wilma 2005)
3. 180 mph (Mitch 1998, Rita 2005, Irma 2017)
4. 175 mph (11 storms, including Maria 2017, Katrina 2005, Andrew 1992, Camille 1969)

Dorian is tied for strongest landfalling Atlantic hurricane on record:

1. 185 mph: Dorian 2019 (Bahamas), Labor Day 1935 (Florida Keys)
2. 180 mph: Irma 2017 (Barbuda, St. Martin, British Virgin Islands)
3. 175 mph: Camille 1969 (Mississippi), Janet 1955 (Mexico), Dean 2007 (Mexico), David 1979 (Dominican Republic), Anita 1977 (Mexico)

And if it gets just a little bit stronger, it could potentially have the strongest winds that we have seen in any Atlantic hurricane ever.

On the Saffir Simpson scale, hurricanes with maximum sustained winds of 130 mph to 156 mph are considered to be “Category 4 storms”, and any storm with sustained winds of 157 mph or greater is considered to be a “Category 5 storm”.

If we gave Category 5 the same 27 mph range that Category 4 has, that would mean that “Category 6” would hypothetically begin at 184 mph.

And since Hurricane Dorian currently has sustained winds of 185 mph that would make it a “Category 6 storm” on our hypothetical scale.

The good news is that Hurricane Dorian appears to be making a sharp turn and may not actually make landfall in the U.S. at all.

If that is what ultimately takes place, that will be extremely good news, but this storm has proven to be exceedingly unpredictable so far and anything could still happen.

By tomorrow morning the forecast may have completely changed once again, and the storm could once again be making a beeline for the coast. If Dorian does make landfall in the U.S., the devastation is likely to be exceedingly great. Just check out what Dorian is doing to the Bahamas at this moment

As the eyewall of the storm hit the island, it bent utility poles and snapped trees and beat buildings with the howling wind. Bahamian Prime Minister Hubert Minnis announced Sunday parts of Marsh Harbor – a town of more than 6,000 – appeared to be ‘underwater’, sending desperate locals onto their roofs for shelter from the floodwaters.

In one heartbreaking video a mother is heard pleading for help and prayers as she is stuck in the upper level of her Abaco Islands home with her baby while huge floods of water inundate the street.

The east coast could be in for a similar fate, and the NOAA is specifically warning that just a “small deviation to the left of the track could bring the intense core of the hurricane” directly over the Florida coast…

Given the uncertainty in the track forecast and the anticipated increase in size of the hurricane, a Hurricane Warning and Storm Surge Warning have been issued for a portion of the Florida east coast. It is once again emphasized that although the official track forecast does not show landfall, users should not focus on the exact track. A small deviation to the left of the track could bring the intense core of the hurricane its dangerous winds closer to or onto the Florida coast.

We are entering a time when many of our old assumptions will no longer apply. This is going to be an era of great turmoil for our planet, and we are seeing bizarre weather extremes all over the world in 2019.

So far this year we have seen one of the bitterly coldest winters in a century, unprecedented rainfall and flooding in the middle of the country, thousands of wildfires burning “the lungs of the Earth” to the ground, and record high temperatures all over the planet this summer.

Now we are dealing with a hurricane that is so intense that it could be considered to be a “Category 6 storm” if the Saffir Simpson scale was expanded, and many people believe that this is just the beginning.

Let’s keep a very close eye on this storm. If it starts heading toward you, get out while you still can, because you definitely don’t want to be there when this monster storm hits.

Get Prepared NowAbout the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally-syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including Get Prepared Now, The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters. His articles are originally published on The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News. From there, his articles are republished on dozens of other prominent websites. If you would like to republish his articles, please feel free to do so. The more people that see this information the better, and we need to wake more people up while there is still time.

“Monster” Hurricane Dorian Is Projected To Be “A Very Big Hurricane, Perhaps One Of The Biggest”

Well, that certainly escalated quickly. On Wednesday we were told that Hurricane Dorian would only be a Category 3 storm when it hits the Florida coastline, but now we are being told that it will be a Category 4 storm. Hurricane Dorian is rapidly gaining strength over very warm waters in the Atlantic Ocean, and the latest forecast has it making landfall somewhere along the east coast of Florida on Monday. If it is officially a Category 4 storm when it arrives, it will be the most powerful storm to hit the east coast of Florida since Hurricane Andrew in 1992. Dorian is being described as a “monster hurricane”, and Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has already declared a state of emergency for all 67 counties in the state of Florida.

We will see how things develop over the next several days, but at this point it has become clear that Dorian has the potential to be an exceedingly dangerous storm.

In fact, President Trump himself is telling us that Dorian could be “perhaps one of the biggest” hurricanes that the U.S. has ever seen…

Hurricane Dorian looks like it will be hitting Florida late Sunday night. Be prepared and please follow State and Federal instructions, it will be a very big Hurricane, perhaps one of the biggest!

The reason why meteorologists are so concerned is because Dorian will be traveling over extremely warm waters for the next 48 hours, and that means that we should see “steady intensification during the next 2 to 3 days”

“The warmer the water, the more moisture is in the air,’’ the website for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says. “And that could mean bigger and stronger hurricanes.’’

The weather service said current conditions in the Atlantic “should allow for at least steady intensification during the next 2 to 3 days.’’

We haven’t seen such favorable conditions for a storm in a very long time, and so ultimately it is difficult to project just how bad this storm will turn out to be.

At this point, authorities are telling us that we should expect winds of “at least 130 mph” when it finally strikes the mainland…

It is in that kind of environment that Hurricane Dorian, currently at Category 1, is expected to gain considerable strength as it heads northwest, with the Sunshine State almost certainly on its path.

Forecasts call for Dorian to increase in intensity and become a Category 4 hurricane, with winds of at least 130 mph, and it could strike the U.S. on Labor Day. The National Hurricane Center says it will “remain an extremely dangerous hurricane through the weekend.’’

It is interesting to note that Thursday is the 14th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina hitting New Orleans. We remember what a monstrous storm that was, but the truth is that it was only a Category 3 storm when it made landfall…

New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell commemorated the 14th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina today during a wreath-laying ceremony.

LaToya and other public officials gathered at the Katrina Memorial on Canal Street to remember the victims of the storm, which made landfall near Grand Isle, Louisiana, in 2005 as a Category 3 storm with winds near 127 mph.

So that means that Hurricane Dorian has the potential to be worse than Hurricane Katrina.

And Florida is not the only state that is in danger. Some meteorologists are warning that after it passes over Florida, Dorian could enter the Gulf of Mexico, restrengthen, and make “a second landfall” somewhere along the Gulf Coast…

Though it’s forecast to hit somewhere along the east coast of Florida, there “is certainly a chance that the storm could drift into the Gulf of Mexico and produce a second landfall,” noted University of Georgia meteorologist Marshall Shepherd in Forbes.

In addition, we shouldn’t discount the possibility that Dorian could continue turning south, bypass Florida entirely, and enter the Gulf of Mexico as one of the most dangerous storms that we have ever seen.

Needless to say, that would definitely be a “nightmare scenario”, and there are many of us that will be watching the development of this storm with great interest.

We just don’t know how this storm is going to play out yet, but store shelves in Florida are already being stripped clean as residents feverishly prepare for what is ahead

In Port Orange, 40 miles northeast of Orlando, Brooke Koontz found shelves of bread and water nearly empty at a Walmart on Wednesday. There were also slim pickings among canned goods, toiletries and bananas, too.

Thankfully, soon after she arrived, employees brought out a pallet of water.

“It was gone in seconds,” she told CNN. “People were trying to race.”

Of course if they had gotten prepared in advance, there would be no need to panic.

What is happening in Florida right now should be a lesson for all of us. If a horrific national crisis of some sort were to suddenly erupt, food and other critical supplies would disappear from the stores almost instantly. If you were not one of the lucky few that got to the stores in time, you would be forced to depend on whatever you already had on hand. And for many Americans, that is not a whole lot.

If this storm is as powerful as they are now projecting, it is likely that there will be widespread power outages. One south Florida resident told one reporter that his family was without power for 13 days after Hurricane Irma struck two years ago…

Sanchez, who was filling tanks of gas for generators after he waited his turn, told NBC affiliate WBBH of Fort Myers that he didn’t want to have to relive what he and his family went through during Hurricane Irma two years ago.

“We were stuck with no electricity for almost 13 days, so you see I’m going to be prepared,” he said.

It certainly appears that this storm will be much more powerful than Hurricane Irma was when it made landfall, and that is really, really bad news for those living in the Sunshine State.

Let’s keep them in prayer, and let’s also hope that this storm doesn’t get into the Gulf of Mexico, because that would be the worst scenario of all for this storm.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally-syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including Get Prepared Now, The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters. His articles are originally published on The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News. From there, his articles are republished on dozens of other prominent websites. If you would like to republish his articles, please feel free to do so. The more people that see this information the better, and we need to wake more people up while there is still time.

We Are Being Told That Dorian Could Become A Category 4 Hurricane Before It Finally Slams Into The U.S. Coast

It now appears that Dorian is going to become a very dangerous storm. When I first heard about Dorian, I wasn’t that concerned because it was a relatively small storm and it was a long way from the east coast. But with each day this storm has become more ominous, and now it looks like it could absolutely hammer the southeast coastline on Labor Day weekend. At this point meteorologists don’t really know where it will make landfall, but their best projections suggest that it could be somewhere along the east coast of Florida. Between now and Labor Day weekend, Dorian will travel over some extremely warm waters, and as you will see below that makes it “a perfect candidate” to become a very powerful storm. Whenever the month of September rolls around, many of us keep a very close eye on any possible hurricanes, and Dorian certainly has the potential to become a monster. Toward the end of this article, I will discuss what I believe would be a “worst case scenario” for this storm.

For the moment, Dorian is headed toward open water, and the National Hurricane Center is anticipating “marked intensification” over the next 72 hours…

As a strengthening Dorian continued to unleash its might on parts of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, the storm headed northwest toward the Atlantic Ocean, where it is expected to grow into a “dangerous hurricane.”

That’s the latest word from the National Hurricane Center, whose 5 p.m. ET forecast calls for Dorian to pick up steam over the Atlantic’s warm water and head toward the U.S. coast as a Category 3 hurricane with winds of at least 111 mph. It’s now a Category 1, with sustained winds of 80 mph, but the NHC predicts “marked intensification” in the next 72 hours.

Although the official forecast is projecting that Dorian will become a Category 3 hurricane, Weather Underground meteorologist Bob Henson has noted that one model is suggesting there is a 31 percent chance that it could become a Category 4 storm

The official NHC forecast calls for steady strengthening of Dorian, bringing it to Category 3 strength by Saturday with 115-mph winds. It is certainly possible that rapid intensification will occur before that point, which could quickly bring Dorian to major-hurricane strength. In fact, the Rapid Intensification Index in the 18Z Wednesday run of the SHIPS model gives a 33% chance of Dorian’s sustained winds reaching Category 3 strength by Thursday afternoon, and a 31% chance of Category 4 strength by Friday afternoon. These are far above typical climatological values, but they cannot be discounted given the very favorable conditions at hand.

As a point of reference, Hurricane Katrina was just a Category 3 storm when it finally made landfall.

So a Category 4 storm is definitely not to be scoffed at.

And the more Dorian stays over open water the more powerful it is likely to become. If Dorian had passed over the mountains of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, it would have weakened significantly, but that didn’t happen

The reason the storm has shifted is because its circulation has been rather disorganized and big convective bursts (clusters of thunderstorms) on the east side of the circulation are making the system lopsided, pulling and tugging the center further east.

This means Dorian will avoid the beating it would have taken if the system had passed over the high mountains of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. Instead, it will emerge north of the islands tonight as a healthy storm system. That healthy system can then more easily intensify as it moves north.

Now the storm is headed for very warm water, and conditions over the coming days make it a perfect candidate “for rapid intensification”

The clockwise flow around the ridge of high pressure will also guide Dorian westward towards the Bahamas, reaching the islands by Saturday and Sunday. Throughout Dorian’s track from Friday to Monday, it will be moving over very warm water ranging from 85 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit. In order for a tropical system to strengthen, water temperatures must be 80 degrees or higher. Clearly these ocean temperatures are plenty warm enough.

Another important factor is Dorian’s small size. Smaller storms have a tendency for faster intensity shifts. And since they are smaller, they can more easily concentrate much of their energy near their core. Small systems, like Dorian, are perfect candidates for rapid intensification, especially when very warm water is waiting.

If Dorian makes landfall on the east coast of Florida as a Category 3 or Category 4 storm, that will be a major disaster.

But it won’t be a worst case scenario.

To me, a “worst case scenario” would be if Dorian grazes Florida or bypasses it altogether and enters the Gulf of Mexico where it strengthens even more before slamming into the Gulf Coast. And according to Weather Underground, this storm has the potential to do just that…

The 12Z Wednesday ensemble runs of the GFS and European models continued to focus on Florida’s Atlantic coast, where the large majority of members now predict landfall. Both of the models shifted a bit south compared to their 0Z Wednesday runs, with the average projected landfall point now at Florida’s central Atlantic coast as opposed to the northeast coast. A westward track across central or southern Florida, as projected by a number of members in both ensembles, would bring Dorian into the Gulf of Mexico, where it could go on to affect the northern Gulf Coast at some point next week.

Ultimately, we don’t know where this storm will strike yet, and so everyone living in the entire Southeast should be getting prepared to deal with Dorian. In an article that was just published, Dagny Taggart suggested some things that many people don’t think about

  • Trim any trees that are hanging over your house.
  • Check your supply of batteries.
  • Figure out what might become a projectile in your yard and make a plan to secure it.
  • Clean out your gutters
  • Check your roof to be sure that there aren’t any loose shingles or potential places for a leak.

And for a more comprehensive list, I would recommend the Red Cross hurricane safety checklist that you can find right here.

Hopefully this storm will eventually fizzle out and won’t become a major threat.

But right now it doesn’t look like that will happen, and so we all need to keep a very close eye on it over the next several days.

Get Prepared NowAbout the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally-syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including Get Prepared Now, The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters. His articles are originally published on The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News. From there, his articles are republished on dozens of other prominent websites. If you would like to republish his articles, please feel free to do so. The more people that see this information the better, and we need to wake more people up while there is still time.

Hurricane Michael And The Number 13

Was Hurricane Michael some sort of warning to America? As you will see below, there appears to be a very strong link between Hurricane Michael and the number 13. And it is also a very strange “coincidence” that the third third most powerful hurricane in U.S. history (Hurricane Michael) made landfall on the exact same day that we witnessed the third largest stock market point crash in U.S. history. Initially, Hurricane Michael was not supposed to be this strong, but it just kept becoming more and more intense the closer it got to the shoreline. And once it finally hit the Florida panhandle, the damage was apocalyptic

The small Gulf Coast community of Mexico Beach was known as a slice of Old Florida.

Now it lies in splinters.

Hit head-on by Hurricane Michael, numerous homes in this resort town of about 1,190 people were shattered or ripped from their foundations. Boats were tossed like toys. The streets closest to the water looked as if a bomb had gone off.

One couple that decided to ride the storm out in their home near the coast almost didn’t survive

“The wind was really tearing us apart. It was so scary you’d poo yourself,” said retiree Tom Garcia, 60, who was trapped inside his Mexico Beach home as water poured in to waist height.

He and his partner Cheri Papineau, 50, pushed on their door for an hour to stop the storm surge bursting in as their four dogs sat on top of a bed floating in their home.

The beach town looked like it had been carpet bombed, with little left in the first blocks from the beach. Further inland, about half the homes were reduced to piles of wood and siding. Helicopters flew overhead looking for survivors as bulldozers plowed paths along roads filled with shredded homes.

But it wasn’t just the ferocious intensity of this storm that made it unique.

It appears that these was a very strong link between this storm and the number 13. In a recent article for Z3News, Heather Bjork summarized the findings presented in a video by Many Fish, and she added some of her own notes…

Here is a summary of his points, followed by a few of my own notes:

  • A pattern of 13 is manifesting through Hurricane Michael. The Biblical meaning of 13 represents REBELLION & LAWLESSNESS.
  • The frequency of 13’s happening now is one of the STRONGEST patterns Many Fish has ever seen.
  • Michael appears 13 times in Revelation in the Bible.
  • The first time Michael appears in the Bible is Numbers 13:13.
  • In Revelation 12, Michael fights the rebellion against God from Satan and his angels (Revelation 12:7).
  • 26 counties (13 + 13) in Florida declared a national emergency before Hurricane Michael made landfall. The news article was updated at 3:13.
  • Hurricane Michael is the 13th named storm of the season.
  • Hurricane Michael was moving at 13 mph.
  • The letter “M” is the 13th letter of 26 (13 + 13) letters in the alphabet
  • Hurricane Michael is now moving into America’s original 13 colonies.
  • Pope Francis recently called on Catholics to do a resurgence of prayer to Michael, using the rosary.
  • 13 states were recently investigated for alleged sexual sexual abuse linked to the Catholic Church.
  • In the Phoenician alphabet, the 13th letter, mom, represents water and is linked to hurricanes.
  • In Daniel 12:1, Michael takes his stand during a time of great trouble, such as never was since there was a nation even to that same time. And at that time, Daniel’s people shall be delivered, “every one that shall be found written in the book.”

My Additional Notes:

Why does the number 13 represent rebellion? Here are a few possible explanations.

  • Nimrod led one of the first rebellions against God, building the tower and city of Babel. He was the thirteenth generation from Adam.
  • The kings of Sodom and Gomorrah rebelled against the rule of King Chedorlaomer of Elam in the 13th year of his reign. (Genesis 14:4)
  • The original 13 colonies of the United States rebelled against England.
  • The Bilderberg Group had a core group of 39 members, consisting of 3 groups of 13 members in each group. The 39 members answer to the 13 who make up the Policy Committee. The 13 members of the Policy Committee answer to the Round Table of Nine.
  • The number 13 also has significance to followers of occult practices. (Source: bibliotecapleyades.net)

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

The Last Days Warrior Summit is the premier online event of 2018 for Christians, Conservatives and Patriots. It is a premium-members only international event that will empower and equip you with the knowledge and tools that you need as global events begin to escalate dramatically. The speaker list includes Michael Snyder, Mike Adams, Dave Daubenmire, Ray Gano, Dr. Daniel Daves, Gary Kah, Justus Knight, Doug Krieger, Lyn Leahz, Laura Maxwell and many more. Full summit access will begin on October 25th, and if you would like to register for this unprecedented event you can do so right here.

10 Mind-Blowing Facts About Hurricane Michael – The 3rd Most Powerful Hurricane Ever To Make Landfall In The U.S.

It wasn’t supposed to be like this. Hurricane Michael was supposed to be a relatively minor storm as hurricanes go, but it just kept getting stronger and stronger as it approached the Florida panhandle. And when it finally did make landfall, it was an absolutely monstrous storm with sustained maximum winds of 155 miles per hour. If those winds had reached 157 miles per hour, it would have been a Category 5 storm. It truly was a “lawnmower from the sky” that shredded just about everything it encountered as it slammed into a part of the country that was very ill-prepared for a storm of this magnitude. Hundreds of thousands of people are already without power, and as you will see below, one major outlet is warning that “most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months”.

It would be difficult to overstate the devastation that this storm has caused. Brock Long, the head of FEMA, is calling Michael “a hurricane of the worst kind”

Even those jaded by hurricanes have never seen anything like this.

For the first time, a Category 4 hurricane slammed into the Florida Panhandle. And it’s bringing an onslaught of deadly hazards.

“Unfortunately, this is a hurricane of the worst kind,” said Brock Long, head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

I have driven through the Florida panhandle, and especially in some of the more rural areas it is a glimpse into a way of life that most of the nation has long forgotten.

But it is also a region that is full of very old houses and buildings, and those structures were never designed for a storm like this. In Panama City, some residents gathered at a local hotel to ride out the storm, but Hurricane Michael nearly reduced it to rubble

People whimpered and prayed, babies cried, children called for their mothers and all the while, bit by bit, the hotel that was saving them from Hurricane Michael’s howling was falling apart, brick by brick and roofing tile by roofing tile.

The hurricane’s eyewall came through Panama City shortly after noon Wednesday, shearing trees in half, twisting roofs from their supports and tossing truck trailers and RVs like toys.

Hurricane Michael will soon be a memory, but the damage caused by this storm will be felt in the Florida panhandle for a very long time to come.

According to the Weather Underground, much of the region “will be uninhabitable for weeks or months”…

Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Please keep the people of the Florida panhandle in your prayers, because recovery is going to take an extended period of time. The following are 10 mind-blowing facts about Hurricane Michael that show just how powerful this storm really was…

-Hurricane Michael made landfall with maximum sustained winds of 155 miles per hour.

-Michael’s winds were just 2 miles per hour short of making it a Category 5 hurricane.

-Michael is the strongest hurricane to ever hit the Florida panhandle.

-Overall, Michael is the third strongest hurricane to ever make landfall in the United States. The only two more powerful storms were the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 and Hurricane Camille in 1969.

-The fact that a total of 30 Waffle Houses closed down for the storm made headlines all over the nation.

-Hurricane Michael was actually a more powerful storm than Hurricane Katrina when it made landfall.

-Hundreds of thousands of people have already lost power as a result of this storm.

-It is being projected that more than a million homes may ultimately lose power before it is all said and done.

-Never before had a Category 4 hurricane made landfall in the Florida panhandle.

-Many have pointed out that an “image of a skull” seems to have appeared at the center of Hurricane Michael as it approached the Florida coastline…

This is yet another example that shows how dramatically our planet is changing.

Not too long ago, Hurricane Florence slammed into the Carolinas causing a massive amount of damage. Now another major storm has struck our nation, and hurricane season is definitely not over yet.

But it isn’t just the U.S. that is getting hammered. Hurricanes and typhoons have been raging all over the globe, and it looks like this could be a record year for global storm damage.

As I have repeatedly warned, Earth changes appear to be accelerating, and that has very alarming implications for the future of every man, woman and child on this planet.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

The Last Days Warrior Summit is the premier online event of 2018 for Christians, Conservatives and Patriots. It is a premium-members only international event that will empower and equip you with the knowledge and tools that you need as global events begin to escalate dramatically. The speaker list includes Michael Snyder, Mike Adams, Dave Daubenmire, Ray Gano, Dr. Daniel Daves, Gary Kah, Justus Knight, Doug Krieger, Lyn Leahz, Laura Maxwell and many more. Full summit access will begin on October 25th, and if you would like to register for this unprecedented event you can do so right here.

Raw Video Shows Dozens Of People Looting A Dollar Store As Flooding Cuts Wilmington Off From The Rest Of North Carolina

A major emergency brings out the best in some people, but in others it brings out the absolute worst. Shocking images of “dozens of people” ransacking a Family Dollar store in Wilmington, North Carolina have stunned the nation. This happened in broad daylight, and many of the looters didn’t even seem to care that a television news crew was filming them. Sadly, this always seems to happen whenever a major disaster takes place. Our established social order is so vulnerable, and so many people out there will gladly take advantage of others if they believe that there is an opportunity to get away with it. If this is how people will behave during a storm, how will they act once things start getting really bad in this country?

At this hour, Florence continues to dump massive amounts of rain on the Mid-Atlantic region, and now the death toll is up to 18. It is being reported that more than 640,000 people are without power, and the National Hurricane Center says that more “catastrophic flooding” is coming as Florence remains stationary over the Carolinas.

Major roads all over North Carolina and South Carolina have been flooded, and some parts of Interstate 95 have had to be shut down.

The flooding is already so bad that the city of Wilmington has been completely cut off from the rest of North Carolina, and that is where the Family Dollar store was looted. One reporter was able to capture raw footage of the looting in progress, and you can see that video on YouTube right here.

This is one of the most disturbing things that I have seen in a long time.

How can people behave like that?

According to one news report, many of the looters were carrying things back to a public housing project right across the street…

Footage from local news station WECT shows dozens of people carrying any items they could get their hands on out of the store and back to a public housing community called Houston Moore.

While there were no members of law enforcement on the scene due to management’s request, police enacted a curfew for the area from 5pm Saturday to 6am Sunday.

They also said many of the alleged looters could be identified in WECT’s video. They encouraged locals to report anyone they recognized in the footage.

If it was just one or two people doing the looting, that would be one thing.

But for “dozens of people” to be looting a store in broad daylight is a very frightening indication as to where we are at as a society.

The storm just arrived a couple days ago, so none of these people were hurting for food or water. They were just immensely greedy, and they decided to loot the store because they thought they could get away with it.

According to one reporter, “you could just see people everywhere”

WECT reporter Chelsea Donovan, who went to the scene with another journalist to film the looting, said: ‘When we came over the hill on Greenfield Street, you could just see people everywhere.’

In her news coverage Donovan gestures into the store’s front entrance as she says: ‘You can see here inside just a complete mess, people taking duffel bags and trash bags, now noticing we’re here [and] running away from the camera.’

And of course this was not the only instance of criminal activity in the region.

Over in Brunswick County, at least 4 crooks were arrested

Dashaun Smith, 25, and Brandon Bellamy, 30, are both charged with possession of burglary tools and break and or enter at Tommy’s Mini Mart in Leland. They are each being held under a $20,000 bond.

Devin Harris, 21, and Justice Harris, 18, are both charged with break or enter a motor vehicle. They are being held under a $5,000 bond each.

We have raised an entire generation that has no moral foundation, and when things take a turn for the worse in this country we are going to see chaos like this all over America.

It doesn’t matter how many laws you have if people don’t follow them. To a very large degree, any free society is heavily dependent on the fact that most people will regulate themselves, and that is one of the reasons why the social decay that we see all around us is so deeply alarming.

Ultimately, we will probably see even more looting before this storm is over, because it is being reported that “the worst flooding is yet to come”

Florence’s merciless deluge has already killed 18, trapped hundreds and made parts of North and South Carolina impassable — and authorities say the worst flooding is yet to come.

The tropical depression will keep dumping rain over parts of North Carolina for the next few days, with numerous rivers expected to crest at major flood stage.

Flooding already is so bad in North Carolina that the state transportation department is telling people not to travel in the state. Numerous highways, including sections of I-95 and I-40, are closed, and road flooding has virtually cut off the coastal city of Wilmington.

Previously, I have discussed the fact that it is being projected that this storm could potentially dump 10 trillion gallons of water on North Carolina. The flooding is already “catastrophic”, and you can view some really good before and after photos right here.

The National Hurricane Center says that up to 40 inches of rain will likely fall on southeastern North Carolina and the northeastern tip of South Carolina. Even though Florence turned out to be not quite as powerful as the experts were anticipating, this is still an extremely, extremely damaging storm.

At times like this, it is so important for communities to come together and support one another.

Unfortunately, some have decided that this is the perfect time for a crime spree, and as an American I am deeply ashamed by what I am seeing.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

Only 9 Percent Of Households In South Carolina And Only 3 Percent Of Households In North Carolina Have Flood Insurance

A lot of people are going to be financially ruined by Hurricane Florence. As you will see below, only 9 percent of all homeowners in South Carolina have flood insurance, and up in North Carolina that figure drops to just 3 percent. That means that well over 90 percent of the people that will be affected by this storm do not have any financial protection against flooding whatsoever. Florence is expected to slowly churn over the region for the next several days, and it is being projected that this massive storm could dump up to 10 trillion gallons of water on the Carolinas. Needless to say, that amount of water is going to do an extraordinary amount of damage, and thousands upon thousands of households are at risk of losing everything because they aren’t carrying insurance.

Paying insurance premiums can seem like a giant waste until the day comes when you actually need it.

If you live anywhere near the east coast, not having flood insurance is not very wise. But unfortunately, that is the situation most homeowners in the Carolinas find themselves in. According to an analysis conducted by McClatchy, only a very small percentage of households in both North Carolina and South Carolina currently have flood insurance…

Thousands of homeowners in inland North and South Carolina stand to be inundated by Hurricane Florence’s drenching over the next few days, but hardly any of them carry federal flood insurance, leaving them at risk of a devastating loss, with little prospect of help from the federal government.

A McClatchy analysis of federal data shows that in the coastal counties, a relatively high percentage of households carry flood insurance policies, but the percentage drops off just a few miles inland. Overall, only 9 percent of households in South Carolina and 3 percent in North Carolina carried federal flood insurance as of mid-2017, according to National Flood Insurance Program data reviewed by McClatchy.

And flooding along coastal areas has already begun.

In fact, it was being reported that at least 150 people had to be rescued in New Bern, North Carolina alone…

Nearly 12 hours after city officials in New Bern, North Carolina, reported that 150 people needed rescue there, that number is unchanged. Some of those who were stranded overnight have been rescued, but new ones needing rescue have been discovered, said New Bern Mayor Dana Outlaw.

The Neuse River has flooded New Bern and Craven County, where the Neuse and Trent rivers meet, forcing some residents who stayed behind amid evacuation orders ahead of Hurricane Florence to wait in attics or on the roofs of their houses to be rescued by boat.

During storms of this magnitude, the water can move extremely quickly. One resident of New Bern went to sleep on Thursday night thinking that everything that was fine, and he awoke to “waves crashing down” around his house…

Tom Ballance said his wife went to Atlanta and he stayed behind in their New Bern home with their three dogs and a cat. At around 3:30 p.m. Thursday, the electricity went out. By midnight, his rain gauge showed that he’d gotten 9 inches of rain since mid-afternoon. He drifted off to sleep. About 40 minutes later, he woke and went to a sun room, where he’d boarded up all the windows except for a small hole. He shone a flashlight through the glass.

“I about jumped out of my skin,” he told The Associated Press in a telephone interview Friday morning. “These were waves crashing down.”

And even though this storm was not as bad as initially feared, people are still being killed

In the first report of storm-related fatalities, a mother and infant died after a tree fell on a house in Wilmington, North Carolina, according to local police. The father was hospitalized with injuries.

In addition, a woman in Hampstead suffered a heart attack Friday morning, but emergency crews could not reach her before she died because of downed trees in the road, ABC News reports.

A fourth person was killed while plugging in a generator in Lenoir County, north of Wilmington, according to WITN-TV, quoting the governor’s office.

At this point, a total of at least five people have died, and many more have been injured.

How bad would have things been if Florence had come ashore as a Category 4 or Category 5 storm?

This is yet another example that shows that the American people are woefully unprepared for when emergency situations disrupt the flow of normal life. I co-authored an entire book about getting prepared, and so many others have put out really great resources, but most people just aren’t listening.

Most Americans only have a few days of food at home, no extra water and are living right on the edge financially.

When a long-term major emergency strikes this nation, most of the population will be out of food, water and money almost immediately.

And so what happens if the government is unwilling or unable to pick up the pieces for everybody?

It is only a matter of time before such a scenario plays out, and it will truly be a very dark day for America indeed.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

A Record 7 Named Storms Are Swirling Across The Globe – Has ‘The Day After Tomorrow’ Arrived?

Is something extremely unusual happening to our planet? At this moment, Hurricane Florence is just one of seven named storms that are currently circling the globe. That matches the all-time record, and it looks like that record will be broken very shortly as a couple more storms continue to develop. Back in 2004, a Hollywood blockbuster entitled “The Day After Tomorrow” depicted a world in which weather patterns had gone mad. One of the most impressive scenes showed nearly the entire planet covered by hurricane-type storms all at once. Of course things are not nearly as bad as in that film, but during this hurricane season we have definitely seen a very unusual number of hurricanes and typhoons develop. As our planet continues to change, could this become “the new normal”?

As I mentioned above there are currently seven named storms that are active, but an eighth is about to join them, and that would break the all-time record

The Hurricane season is causing devastation from the Pacific to the Atlantic as seven active storms are currently swirling across the globe – with high chances an eighth powerful storm will soon develop to break an all-time record.

And actually there is an additional storm that is also developing in the Pacific which could bring the grand total to nine.

Overall, there have been 9 named storms in the Atlantic and 15 names storms in the Pacific since the official start of the hurricane season.

That is not normal.

In fact, one veteran meteorologist has said that he has “NEVER seen so much activity in the tropics”…

Far from being the biggest threat facing the US coastline this hurricane season, Florence will be followed by several other storms that rapidly strengthening in the Atlantic. As one veteran meteorologist remarked, “in my 35 years forecasting the weather on TV, I have NEVER seen so much activity in the tropics all at the same time.”

Meanwhile, the biggest storm on the planet is actually in the Pacific Ocean.

Super Typhoon Mangku is a Category 5 hurricane, and it absolutely dwarfs Hurricane Florence

The devastating force of Hurricane Florence is nothing when compared to the category 5 hurricane sweeping over the Pacific Ocean, Super Typhoon Mangkhu.

With winds close to 180mph, the fierce hurricane is feared to land over a mountainous terrain in the northern Philippines on Friday night, before moving over the South China Sea and potentially impacting Hong Kong and Vietnam.

But let’s not minimize the seriousness of Hurricane Florence. It is currently approximately the size of the state of Michigan, and even though it has been downgraded forecasters are still predicting that it will bring up to 40 inches of rain in some areas.

One meteorologist ran the numbers, and he determined that if the current forecasts are accurate the state of North Carolina could end up getting ten trillion gallons of rain

Weather.us meteorologist Ryan Maue crunched some numbers and tweeted that North Carolina’s 7-day rainfall forecast by the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center would be like getting “a total of over 10 trillion gallons” of rain from Florence. The math was based on the projected state average of 10.1 inches of rainfall for that time span.

Yes, you read that correctly.

Ten trillion gallons of rain.

Needless to say, all of that water is going to cause an immense amount of damage.

Over in Virginia, a top official is warning that “there could be a number of dams that will fail”

In neighboring Virginia, officials with the state’s Department of Conservation and Recreation have identified some 100 dams they are concerned could be at risk, either because of “spotty inspection records” or because they are still being built.

“If we get 20 inches of rain in a relatively short period of time,” Russ Baxter, the department’s deputy director told the WSJ, “there could be a number of dams that will fail.”

As I write this article, some areas along the coast are already getting hammered. Atlantic Beach has received more than 12 inches of rain, and other towns are already inundated with water.

It is going to be a long couple of days for those living along the Mid-Atlantic coast, and there were reports of panic among those making last-minute preparations

A rowdy crowd was shown in a Facebook video shared by an employee from the supermarket off Glenn School Road in Durham Tuesday pushing one another and shouting as they hurried around the store to gather their supplies.

Police officers were even spotted making their rounds around the Walmart to ensure the safety of shoppers.

One officer is seen restraining a young boy as another shopper drops several bottles of water.

This is yet another example that shows that you never wait until the last minute to get what you need.

In the end, the damage to property will be in the tens of billions of dollars, but only a handful of people will probably lose their lives.

Now that the storm has been downgraded, some are even booking rooms along the coast so that they can say that they rode the storm out.

For instance, 53-year-old Barry Freed says that he is sticking around so that he can cross this off his “bucket list”

For Barry Freed, 53, riding out a hurricane was a chance to cross something off his “bucket list.”

Armed with a few sodas, some M&Ms, Doritos and a copy of Moby Dick, the Greensboro resident booked an AirBnB at a condo here.

As skies darkened Thursday and winds whipped up at Waterway Lodge, just off the marina near Wrightsville Beach, Freed admitted he wasn’t really prepared.

“I kind of thought of this impulsively,” he said. “It’s kind of a stupid idea.”

Yes, it probably is a stupid idea, but I admire his courage.

This storm will come and go, and the recovery will take an extended period of time.

But the much bigger story is what is happening to our planet on a larger scale. These storms are increasing in number and intensity, and that should definitely alarm all of us.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

It Is Now Being Projected That Florence Will Be The Most Expensive Hurricane To Ever Hit The United States

We all knew that Hurricane Florence was going to be bad, but now it is being projected that it will cause more economic damage than any other storm in all of U.S. history. As you will see below, one firm is estimating that the total damage from Florence could cost “more than $170 billion”, and that would put it into first place by a substantial margin. At this point, meteorologists are telling us that Florence may only be a Category 2 or a Category 3 storm by the time it makes landfall, but we need to remember that Hurricane Katrina was just a Category 3 storm when it hit New Orleans. But what made Katrina so damaging was the fact that it was so large, and Florence is getting bigger in size with each passing day. In addition, forecasters are also now telling us that Florence is expected to “stall” just off the east coast and could potentially linger there “for days”

Hurricane Florence’s path suddenly shifted overnight and is promising to bring even more devastation than first predicted to the Carolinas and parts of Georgia – with the Michigan-sized storm now set to linger for days and cause catastrophic flooding with up to four feet of rain and 13-foot storm surges.

The longer Florence sticks around, the more economic damage it is going to do.

According to the Daily Mail, the latest forecasts indicate that some areas of the Carolinas and Georgia could experience hurricane conditions “for at least 24 hours”

The new trajectory means the storm will idle at sea for longer, creating even heavier and prolonged rains and storm surges for the Carolinas and possibly northern parts of Georgia. Forecasters say those areas could be battered with hurricane conditions for at least 24 hours.

Let me try to put this into perspective for you.

Try to think of something extremely painful that has happened to you.

Would you rather experience that for a minute or for an hour?

You see, it isn’t just the intensity of the storm that matters. The duration is a major factor too, and what we could be facing from Hurricane Florence could be without precedent.

In fact, one computer model is shockingly projecting that some areas of North Carolina could get 45 inches of rain

One trusted computer model, the European simulation, predicted more than 45 inches in parts of North Carolina.

A year ago, people would have laughed off such a forecast, but the European model was accurate in predicting 60 inches for Hurricane Harvey in the Houston area, so “you start to wonder what these models know that we don’t,” University of Miami hurricane expert Brian McNoldy said.

Could you imagine getting nearly four feet of rain where you live?

As that rain is coming down, the wind is going to be whipping at a speed of about 100 miles an hour, and let us not forget that the storm surge kills more people than anything else during a hurricane.

Nobody should be underestimating the sheer power of this storm. There is a reason why one FEMA official publicly declared that this is going to be like “a Mike Tyson punch to the Carolina coast”

Jeff Byard, FEMA associate administrator for the Office of Response and Recovery, called Florence “a very dangerous storm.”

“This is going to be a Mike Tyson punch to the Carolina coast,” he warned.

It just occurred to me that some of my readers may be so young that they don’t even know who Mike Tyson is.

If you don’t know, trust me, just Google him.

Anyway, as I mentioned at the top of this article, it looks like this storm may end up being the costliest hurricane in all of United States history. The following comes from Fox News

Analytics firm CoreLogic predicts that the damage from Florence could be more than $170 billion – making it the most expensive hurricane to hit the continental U.S.

Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey, which decimated parts of the Gulf states and Texas in 2005 and 2017 respectively, cost more than $125 billion. Hurricane Sandy, which hit the Mid-Atlantic and New England areas in 2012, came in at $65 billion, according to the National Hurricane Center.

It is well over a decade later, and the economy of New Orleans has never fully recovered from Hurricane Katrina.

Let us pray that the Carolinas escape a similar fate, but if this storm was going to miss us it would have turned by now.

It really does appear that we are about to be hit by the worst natural disaster that the Mid-Atlantic region has experienced in modern American history, and that is why the National Weather Service is describing Florence as “the storm of a lifetime”

The National Weather Service described Florence as ‘the storm of a lifetime for portions of the Carolina coast’. It said the hurricane’s center would approach the coast of North Carolina or South Carolina on Thursday and Friday before moving slowly near the coastline through Saturday.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency warned that Wednesday was the last day for people to safely evacuated before the hurricane hit.

This is yet another example that shows that our planet is becoming increasingly unstable.

At this moment, there are more than half a dozen major tropical storms brewing in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans combined, and that is not normal.

Our world is in a rapid state of change, and it is going to be a rough ride ahead for all of us.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

“I’ve Never Seen Anything Like This”: Meteorologists Expect Florence To Stall And Hammer The East Coast “For Days”

The bizarre story of Hurricane Florence just keeps becoming even more strange. The good news is that meteorologists are telling us that the storm is expected to lose intensity as it approaches the east coast, but the really, really bad news is that it is now being projected that Florence will slow down and finally stall just off the coastline. In a worst-case scenario, the Carolinas and Georgia could be pounded with wind and rain “for days”, and some areas of North Carolina could end up being buried under nine feet of water. And even though the peak wind speed of Florence has diminished some, the storm just continues to expand in size. That means that it will ultimately hit a larger portion of the east coast than originally anticipated, and the overall economic cost will also ultimately be worse than the experts were forecasting.

The word “unprecedented” is being used a lot in conjunction with this storm. It is behaving in ways that it shouldn’t be, and this “strange stall” along the east coast is absolutely baffling the experts.

While discussing this “stall”, Weather Channel meteorologist Greg Postel stated that he had “never seen anything like this”

The weird saga of Hurricane Florence, which has already carved an unprecedented path across the Atlantic, is forecast to persist with a strange stall and trek along the Southeast coast.

Instead of roaring ashore and quickly heading inland and weakening, as most storms do, Hurricane Florence should instead “stall near the coast and then parallel southwestward toward Georgia,” Weather Channel meteorologist Greg Postel said. “I’ve never seen anything like this.”

And don’t let the fact that Hurricane Florence has been downgraded from a Category 4 storm fool you. The wind speed may be down a bit, but the storm just keeps getting larger, and on Wednesday it was producing waves that were up to 83 feet tall.

If this storm really does stall off of the Carolina coastline, the devastation will be off the charts. The following comes from CNN

Florence’s predicted slow southward turn on Friday would mean some coastal areas could get damaging hurricane-force winds for more than 24 hours. “If this blows at 120 mph for four hours, … you lose a shingle every two minutes, and all of the sudden, you’ve lost your whole roof after four hours,” CNN meteorologist Chad Myers said.

In addition to extreme wind damage, we could also see unprecedented rainfall totals and flooding

While it sits and spins, the heavy rain Florence unleashes will lead to “catastrophic” and “life-threatening” flooding in the Carolinas. Widespread reports of 20 to 30 inches of rain are likely, and some spots could see 40 inches.

As if that weren’t enough “isolated tornadoes will become a threat Thursday along the North Carolina coast,” the National Weather Service in Wilmington said.

Could you imagine getting 40 inches of rain in a 24 hour period?

And what will things look like if Hurricane Florence decides to stall for an extended period of time and stay roughly in one place for several days?

We don’t know exactly what the storm will do following the “stall”, but what we do know is that the damage from this storm will be immense.

In fact, one FEMA official is warning that power could be knocked out for many people in the danger area for “weeks”

“This one really scares me,” National Hurricane Center Director Ken Graham told CBS.

“This storm is going to knock out power days into weeks. It’s going to destroy infrastructure. It’s going to destroy homes,” said Jeff Byard, an official at the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

If you live in the path of this storm, hopefully you have evacuated already.

If you haven’t evacuated, hopefully you have stocked up on supplies, because most of the stores have already been completely cleaned out. At this point, even gasoline is in very short supply

Michelle Stober loaded up valuables on Tuesday at her home on Wrightsville Beach to drive back to her primary residence in Cary, North Carolina. Finding fuel for the journey was tough.

“This morning I drove around for an hour looking for gas in Cary. Everyone was sold out,” she said.

And remember, this is just a temporary emergency. Eventually this storm will pass and the region will begin to recover.

In the event of an even worse emergency that is more long-term in nature, what will you do when all of the supplies are gone and the stores aren’t going to get anything else for the foreseeable future?

On another note, many have found it very interesting that federal officials held a major exercise in which they simulated a Category 4 hurricane slamming into the Mid-Atlantic region back in late April and early May. Representatives from 91 different federal departments and agencies took part in this exercise, and the results of the exercise were quite alarming

Just months ago, disaster planners simulated a Category 4 hurricane strike alarmingly similar to the real-world scenario now unfolding on a dangerously vulnerable stretch of the East Coast.

A fictional ‘Hurricane Cora’ barreled into southeast Virginia and up the Chesapeake Bay to strike Washington, D.C., in the narrative created by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Argonne National Laboratory.

The result was catastrophic damage, which has some experts concerned that Hurricane Florence could produce a disaster comparable to 2005’s Hurricane Katrina and in a part of the country that is famously difficult to evacuate.

It is important to remember that Hurricane Katrina was only a Category 3 hurricane when it finally made landfall. But it was such a massive storm that it absolutely overwhelmed New Orleans.

We could be facing a similar scenario this time around. Hurricane Florence may only be a Category 2 or a Category 3 hurricane when it finally makes landfall, but it looks like it is going to do an unprecedented amount of damage.

So please be in prayer for those living along the Mid-Atlantic coast, because this may end up being the worst storm that they have ever experienced.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

A Federal Simulation Found That A Category 4 Hurricane Could Damage A Nuclear Power Plant, And Now That Exact Scenario Could Happen For Real

Would it surprise you to learn that there was a “national level exercise” in late April and early May that simulated what would happen if a Category 4 hurricane hit the Mid-Atlantic region? As you will see below, this actually happened, and now it looks like we will be facing that precise scenario for real. Authorities are warning that Hurricane Florence could produce a storm surge of somewhere around 20 feet when it makes landfall and dump up to 45 inches of rain on some areas of North Carolina. But of even greater concern is the fact that there are 12 nuclear power reactors directly in the path of this storm. The federal simulation that was held earlier this year concluded that a Category 4 storm could damage a nuclear power plant, and if that happens with this storm we could potentially be facing America’s version of the Fukushima disaster.

Let’s break this down one step at a time.

A few months ago, officials from 91 different federal departments and agencies participated in the “national level exercise” that I mentioned above. The following comes from MSN

Senior leaders from the White House, along with more than 91 federal departments and agencies, participated in the “national level exercise” in late April and early May, FEMA said.

Now here we are just a few months later, and this extremely rare event is actually happening.

A category 4 hurricane is headed directly for us, and the federal exercise determined that a storm of this magnitude could damage a nuclear power plant

The simulated hurricane knocked out power for most gas stations in the Mid-Atlantic region, damaged a nuclear power plant and sent debris into major shipping channels, among other problems, according to a Department of Energy simulation manual.

“What they were trying to do was create a worst-case scenario, but it’s a very realistic scenario,” said Joshua Behr, a research professor at Virginia’s Old Dominion University who is involved in disaster modeling and simulations.

There are 12 nuclear reactors in the Carolinas, and each one of them is near a body of water because water is required for cooling purposes

According to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), there are twelve operating nuclear power plants in the Carolinas that make electricity by the continuous splitting of uranium atoms (i.e., a nuclear reaction). These plants generally reside near a body of water—a river, lake, estuary or ocean—because they require a constant source of water for cooling purposes. Without cooling water, a nuclear reactor will overheat, leading to core damage, containment failure, and release of harmful radiation into the environment.

But being near a body of water makes them very vulnerable to flooding.

And flooding is what caused the Fukushima disaster

Flooding from the storm could be catastrophic for the nuclear power plants. Excessive amounts of water can damage equipment or knock out the plants’ electrical systems, disabling its cooling mechanisms. This is what happened at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant in Japan as a result of the March 2011 tsunami, causing severe damage to the plant’s reactors.

Of particular concern are the two nuclear reactors at the Brunswick nuclear power facility that are located right along the coast.

The Brunswick nuclear power facility is more than 40 years old, and it is less than 2 miles away from the Atlantic Ocean.

And it is only about 20 feet above sea level and it is surrounded by wetlands.

So if Hurricane Florence produces a storm surge of somewhere around 20 feet, both reactors at the Brunswick nuclear power facility could easily be flooded.

Here is more information about these reactors from Mike Adams

Each unit produces nearly 1,000 MWe of electricity, and they are both built on the General Electric “Type 4” power plant design, which is almost identical to the GE nuclear power plant design used in the Fukushima-Daiichi reactors in Japan. All of these reactors are designed and constructed as “boiling-water reactors” or BWRs. The designs are decades old, and they are subject to catastrophic failures and even core meltdowns that release radioactive isotopes directly into the atmosphere and surrounding areas.

Just like the reactors at Fukushima, the Brunswick reactors rely on electricity to operate the cooling pumps that constantly circulate water.

And just like the reactors at Fukushima, the Brunswick reactors have multiple backup systems in case local power is shut off, but just like with Fukushima a massive wall of ocean water could potentially render all of those backup systems inoperable. Here is more from Mike Adams

The answer is found in the storm surge — a massive wave of ocean water that swept through the Fukushima facility, drowning the diesel generators, coolant pumps and backup batteries. In effect, Fukushima was inundated with ocean water, and everything stopped functioning. But the physics of the fuel rods was still operating, and you can’t stop fission reactions just by hoping and wishing. So the fuel rods melted down and a nuclear meltdown took place, producing the Fukushima catastrophe we’re all still suffering under today.

Are you starting to understand what we are potentially facing?

And if we have a major incident at Brunswick or one of the other nuclear facilities in the Carolinas, it could potentially affect the entire east coast

It probably goes without saying, but if the Brunswick nuclear power plant goes into a meltdown, the entire U.S. East Coast would suffer unprecedented radiological contamination and disaster. This includes Washington D.C., Virginia, New York and perhaps even Boston, depending on wind speed and direction.

Of course this is a worst-case scenario, but these days we need to be prepared for worst-case scenarios because they seem to keep happening.

But even if all of the nuclear reactors come through okay, this is still an exceedingly dangerous storm.

If you live in the Mid-Atlantic, please do what you can to get prepared. The following checklist was originally posted on Reddit, and I would encourage you to share it with everyone that you can…

  1. Charge any device that provides light. Laptops, tablets, cameras, video cameras, and old phones. Old cell phones can still be used for dialing 911. Charge external battery back ups (power banks).
  2. Wash all trash cans, big and small, and fill with water for flushing toilets. Line outdoor trash cans with trash bags, fill with water and store in the garage. Water in trash bags should not be used to bathe or drink. Bags contain chemicals to suppress insect and odor. Use for toilet flushing purposes only.
  3. Fill every tub and sink with water. Cover sinks with Saran Wrap to keep it from collecting dust. Fill washing machine and leave lid up to store water.
  4. Fill old empty water bottles and other containers with water and keep near sinks for washing hands.
  5. Fill every Tupperware with water and store in freezer. These will help keep food cold longer and serve as a back up water supply.
  6. Fill drinking cups with water and cover with Saran Wrap. Store as many as possible in fridge. The rest you can store on the counter and use first before any water bottles are opened. Ice is impossible to find after the storm.
  7. Reserve fridge space for storing tap water and keep the sealed water bottles on the counter.
  8. Cook any meats in advance and other perishable foods. You can freeze cooked food. Hard boil eggs for snacks for first day without power.
  9. Be well hydrated before the storm hits and avoid salty foods that make you dehydrated.
  10. Wash all dirty clothes and bed sheets. Anything dirty will smell without the A/C, you may need the items, and with no A/C, you’ll be sweating a lot. You’re going to want clean sheets.
  11. Toss out any expiring food, clean cat litter boxes, empty all trash cans in the house, including bathrooms. Remove anything that will cause an odor when the A/C is off. If you don’t have a trash day pickup before the storm, find a dumpster.
  12. Bring in any yard decor, secure anything that will fly around, secure gates, bring in hoses, potted plants, etc. Bring in patio furniture and grills.
  13. Clean your environment so you have clear, easy escape routes. Even if that means temporarily moving furniture to one area.
  14. Scrub all bathrooms so you are starting with a clean odor free environment. Store water filled trash cans next to each toilet for flushing.
  15. Place everything you own that is important and necessary in a backpack or small file box that is easy to grab. Include your wallet with ID, phone, hand sanitizer, snacks, etc. Get plastic sleeves for important documents.
  16. Make sure you have cash on hand.
  17. Stock up on pet food and fill up bowls of water for pets.
  18. Refill any medications. Most insurance companies allow for 2 emergency refills per year.
  19. Fill your propane tanks. You can heat soup cans, boil water, make coffee, and other stuff besides just grilling meat. Get an extra, if possible.
  20. Drop your A/C in advance and lower temperatures in your fridges.
  21. Gather all candles, flashlights, lighters, matches, batteries, first aid kit and other items and keep them accessible.
  22. Clean all counters in advance. Start with a clean surface. Buy Clorox Wipes for cleaning when there is no power. Mop your floors and vacuum. If power is out for 10 days, you’ll have to live in the mess you started with.
  23. Pick your emergency safe place such as a closet under the stairs. Store the items you’ll need in that location for the brunt of the storm. Make a hand fan for when the power is out.
  24. Shower just before the storm is scheduled to hit.
  25. Keep baby wipes next to each toilet. Don’t flush them. It’s not the time to risk clogging your toilet!
  26. Run your dishwasher, don’t risk having dirty smelly dishes and you need every container for water! Remember you’ll need clean water for brushing your teeth, washing yourself, and cleaning your hands.
  27. Pack a small suitcase and keep it in your car in case you decide to evacuate. Also put at least one jug of water in your car. It will still be there if you don’t evacuate. You don’t need to store all water in the house. Remember to pack for pets as well.
  28. Check on all family members, set up emergency back up plans, and check on elderly neighbors.
  29. Pets are family too. Take them with you.
  30. Before the storm, unplug all electronics. There will be power surges during and after the storm.
  31. Cover televisions, computer monitors and other electronic devices with trash bags in case windows break and expose the interior of the house to the elements.
  32. Cover windows with plywood from the outside.
  33. Gas up your car and have a spare gas container for your generator or your car when you run out.
  34. Touch base with neighbors prior to the storm to determine if they are ready and capable to weather the storm. Building relationships with neighbors also comes in handy if you need to borrow a chainsaw or need extra hands to clear debris.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

People Are “Fighting For Food” As Authorities Warn Florence “Could Produce A Disaster Comparable” To Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Florence is about to make a “direct hit” on the east coast, and public officials are making one ominous declaration about this storm after another. Florence is being called “extremely dangerous”, “a monster”, “the worst in 60 years” and “the storm of a lifetime”. By the end of this week we shall see if this storm lives up to the hype, but at this point it is definitely an immensely powerful storm. Hurricanes of this magnitude very rarely come this far north, and panic is starting to set in all across the mid-Atlantic region as people realize that this is really happening. Over a million people are in the process of evacuating, and it is being reported that there is “fighting for food” at the stores that still have some supplies left…

“It was chaotic! Oh my goodness, long lines!” said Fatimah Spivey.

Reilly Norman described it as “a mess in there; it’s wiped out clean.”

The water aisles were especially bare — empty shelf after empty shelf.

“We came around 1 and all the waters were gone,” said Blake Swain. “Now, it’s just people fighting for food.”

Interestingly, federal officials actually conducted a “simulation” that involved a category 4 hurricane hitting the mid-Atlantic region back in late April and early May

Just months ago, disaster planners simulated a Category 4 hurricane strike alarmingly similar to the real-word scenario now unfolding on a dangerously vulnerable stretch of the East Coast.

That “simulation” produced “catastrophic damage” along the east coast, and as a result some experts are now concerned “that Hurricane Florence could produce a disaster comparable to 2005’s Hurricane Katrina“…

A fictional “Hurricane Cora” barreled into southeast Virginia and up the Chesapeake Bay to strike Washington, D.C., in the narrative created by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Argonne National Laboratory.

The result was catastrophic damage, which has some experts concerned that Hurricane Florence could produce a disaster comparable to 2005’s Hurricane Katrina and in a part of the country that is famously difficult to evacuate.

Let us hope that does not happen, because New Orleans still has not fully recovered from Hurricane Katrina after all this time.

But at this point things look very grim. The computer models are predicting a storm surge of somewhere around 20 feet and up to 45 inches of rain in some parts of North Carolina.

In addition, it is being projected that the insurance industry could be facing up to 20 billion dollars in losses.

And all of those numbers assume that this will remain a Category 4 storm. According to CNN, there is still a possibility that Florence “could become close to a Category 5 storm” before it slams into the Carolinas…

As of Tuesday morning, Florence was hurling 130-mph winds. Before it pummels the US coastline, Florence could become close to a Category 5 storm — meaning winds could approach 157 mph.

But even a Category 4 storm would be immensely devastating.

A 20 foot storm surge would cause more damage than the wind or the rain from the hurricane would. It would essentially be a giant “wall of water” that would “swallow parts of the coast”

“Storm surge has the highest potential to kill the most amount of people,” FEMA Administrator Brock Long said. “It also has the highest potential to cause the most destruction.”

Storm surge is basically a wall of water that could swallow parts of the coast.

“This will have a storm surge in the 20-foot range,” Myers said.

And meteorologists are warning that in a worst-case scenario we could actually see Florence stall along the east coast for an extended period of time. According to the Weather Underground, this is how that could happen…

The steering currents driving Florence toward the East Coast will collapse on Friday, and models now agree the storm is likely to stall somewhere within 100 miles on either side of the coast, perhaps for one or two days.

The 12Z Tuesday run of the European model introduced a new and very distressing possibility: Florence stalling just offshore of North Carolina near Wilmington for roughly a day, then moving southwestward along and just off the South Carolina coast on Saturday, and finally making landfall close to Savannah, Georgia, on Sunday—all while still a hurricane. This outlandish-seeming prospect gained support from the 18Z run of the GFS model. It painted a very similar picture, with a landfall a bit farther north, near Charleston, on Sunday. The 18Z track from the experimental GFS FV3 model is very similar to the GFS track.

In such a scenario, the damage caused by this storm would be multiplied.

To say that this storm is “dangerous” would be a major understatement. And let us not forget that there are 12 nuclear power reactors directly in the path of this storm. If things go bad, they could go really, really bad.

As the storm draws closer to the coast, federal officials are begging people to get prepared…

Federal officials begged residents to put together emergency kits and have a plan on where to go.

“This storm is going to knock out power days into weeks. It’s going to destroy infrastructure. It’s going to destroy homes,” said Jeff Byard, an official at the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Of course those that have waited until now may find that it is already too late.

Gasoline stations all over the mid-Atlantic are already running out of gas, and store shelves are being “picked clean” of essential supplies…

Long lines formed at service stations, and some started running out of gas as far west as Raleigh, with bright yellow bags, signs or rags placed over the pumps to show they were out of order. Some store shelves were picked clean.

“There’s no water. There’s no juices. There’s no canned goods,” Kristin Harrington said as she shopped at a Walmart in Wilmington.

A “perfect storm” is literally heading for the east coast, and some believe that this could be a metaphor for what is happening to the nation as a whole.

For those of you living in the mid-Atlantic, please get out of the path of this storm, and our prayers are with you.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

Hurricane Florence To Intensify “To Near Category 5 Strength” And There Are 12 Nuclear Power Reactors In The Carolinas

The latest forecast is projecting that Hurricane Florence will strengthen “to near category 5 strength” before it makes landfall in the Carolinas, and it is being called “a serious threat to lives and property”. It is extremely rare for a hurricane of this intensity to come this far north, and one expert is claiming that Florence “has the potential to be the most destructive hurricane we’ve had in modern history for this region.” At this time, the government is warning of “a life-threatening storm surge” of up to 20 feet or higher, “life-threatening freshwater flooding”, and “damaging hurricane-force winds”. But there is another factor that not a lot of people are talking about. There are 12 nuclear power reactors in the Carolinas, including two that are located right along the coast.

According to Google, there are 7 nuclear power reactors in South Carolina…

South Carolina hosts seven operating nuclear power reactors: Catawba Units 1 & 2, Oconee Units 1, 2 & 3, H. B.

And Google says that there are 5 nuclear power reactors in North Carolina…

North Carolina hosts five operating nuclear power reactors: Brunswick Units 1 & 2, McGuire Units 1 & 2, and Shearon Harris Unit 1. These account for nearly 32% of electricity generation in the state.

It is the two reactors at the Brunswick plant that are of the most concern because they sit right along the coast and they are directly in the projected path of the storm.

The following is what Wikipedia has to say about those reactors…

The Brunswick nuclear power plant, named for Brunswick County, North Carolina, covers 1,200 acres (490 ha). The site is adjacent to the town of Southport, North Carolina, and to wetlands and woodlands, and was opened in 1975.

The site contains two General Electric boiling water reactors, which are cooled by water collected from the Cape Fear River and discharged into the Atlantic Ocean.

In a worst case scenario, could we potentially be facing America’s version of Fukushima?

Hurricane Florence greatly intensified on Monday. This is an excerpt from the very latest NOAA forecast

1. A life-threatening storm surge is likely along portions of the coastlines of South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, and a Storm Surge Watch will likely be issued for some of these areas by Tuesday morning. All interests from South Carolina into the mid-Atlantic region should ensure they have their hurricane plan in place and follow any advice given by local officials.

2. Life-threatening freshwater flooding is likely from a prolonged and exceptionally heavy rainfall event, which may extend inland over the Carolinas and Mid Atlantic for hundreds of miles as Florence is expected to slow down as it approaches the coast and moves inland.

3. Damaging hurricane-force winds are likely along portions of the coasts of South Carolina and North Carolina, and a Hurricane Watch will likely be issued by Tuesday morning. Damaging winds could also spread well inland into portions of the Carolinas and Virginia.

And according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami, there is definitely a possibility that Hurricane Florence could still strengthen into a category 5 storm

Experts weren’t ready to rule out the possibility that Florence could even make landfall as a Category 5 hurricane, a feat never achieved by any recorded storm in the region. Dennis Feltgen, a spokesperson for the National Hurricane Center in Miami, says that reaching Category 5 is “certainly a possibility.” If Florence doesn’t undergo a phenomenon known as an eyewall replacement cycle, which would weaken the storm, it has a chance of reaching the 157-mph boundary line and making history, Feltgen says.

As I mentioned earlier, it is very rare for a storm of this magnitude to make landfall this far north

Landfalling Category 4 hurricanes are rare in the mainland U.S., with just 24 such landfalls since 1851—an average of one every seven years. (Category 5 landfalls are rarer still, with just three on record). All but three of these 27 landfalls by Cat4s and Cat5s have occurred south of South Carolina’s latitude; thus, Florence will be in very select company if it manages to make landfall at Category 4 strength in North or South Carolina.

We only have a couple of previous storms to go on in order to evaluate how bad the storm surge might be. Unfortunately, water can pile up to enormous heights in this particular region because the continental shelf “extends out more than 50 miles from shore”

It’s a good thing that landfalls by such strong hurricanes are rare along the South Carolina and North Carolina coast, since this coastline is extremely vulnerable to high storm surges. Two of these three historical Carolina Category 4 hurricanes generated a storm tide of 18 – 20 feet: Hugo of 1989 and Hazel of 1954. The other storm–Gracie of 1959–did not (it hit at low tide, significantly reducing the coastal flooding). The storm tide is the combination of the storm surge and the normal lunar tide, measured in height above sea level. The National Hurricane Center uses the terminology “height above ground level” when discussing the storm tide, meaning the height the surge plus tide gets above the normal high tide mark.

The high vulnerability of this coastline is because the continental shelf extends out more than 50 miles from shore, creating a large region of shallow water less than 150 feet deep just offshore that forces storm surge waters to pile up to staggering heights.

In a worst case scenario, we could be talking about an unprecedented mountain of water slamming into the Carolina coastline.

In fact, it is being projected that if Hurricane Florence becomes a category 5 storm that we could see a storm surge of up to 33 feet

WU’s storm surge inundation maps for the U.S. coast, computed using NOAA’s SLOSH model, tell a frightening story. Depending on where its center makes landfall, a mid-strength Category 4 hurricane with 145 mph winds hitting at high tide, in a worst-case scenario, can generate a storm tide in excess of twenty feet above ground level along the entire coast of South Carolina, and along most of the coast of southern North Carolina from the South Carolina border to Morehead City. Many locations could see a higher surge, of up to 27 feet. And a Category 5 storm is much worse: a theoretical peak storm tide of 33 feet is predicted by the SLOSH model for the Intracoastal Waterway north of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. These peak surges occur over a 10 – 40 mile stretch of coast where the right eyewall makes landfall.

Let us hope that does not happen, because it is hard to imagine the immense devastation that such a storm surge would cause.

And remember – the two nuclear power reactors right along the coast at the Brunswick facility are directly in the path of this storm.

As news about the intensity of this storm has spread, “panic prepping” has been happening all over the Carolinas. The following comes from Zero Hedge

With memories of the devastation wrought by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria still fresh in the minds of US consumers, residents of South and North Carolina are taking zero chances as Hurricane Florence – now a Category 4 storm – barrels toward the eastern seaboard. According to local media reports, store shelves have been cleared of vital supplies like bottled water and food as anxious southerners brace for the worst-case scenario.

Shelves at Wal-Marts in North Carolina and South Carolina had been cleared out by Sunday evening, forcing the stores to frantically restock shelves as residents loaded up on everything from water to plywood to generators, per WGN9. Flashlights and batteries also flew off the shelves.

Of course if people had been prepared ahead of time, they would not have to be scrambling for rapidly disappearing supplies at the stores.

And it is being projected that more than a million people will evacuate from coastal areas by the time that this storm reaches shore…

Hurricane Florence is plowing toward the East Coast as a Category 4 storm with a 500-mile wing span, forcing dire warnings and mandatory evacuations – including the entire coastline of South Carolina and parts of Virginia and North Carolina.

In South Carolina alone, more than 1 million residents and tourists are expected to flee from coastal areas, Gov. Henry McMaster said Monday, vowing that state officials “are not going to gamble” with people’s lives.

This is an extremely dangerous storm, and I strongly urge those that live in the region to play it safe.

You can always replace property, but we only get one chance at this life, and so please do not be reckless with yours.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

FEMA to Americans: Don’t Count on Us This Hurricane Season

(The New Republic) In a report last week evaluating its response to last year’s disaster, FEMA details “how ill-prepared the agency was to manage a crisis outside the continental United States, like the one in Puerto Rico,” The New York Times reported. “And it urges communities in harm’s way not to count so heavily on FEMA in a future crisis.”

“The work of emergency management does not belong just to FEMA,” the agency stated near the end of the report. “It is the responsibility of the whole community, federal, [state, local, tribal and territorial governments], private sector partners, and private citizens to build collective capacity and prepare for the disasters we will inevitably face.”

The Storm Of The Decade: 23 Key Facts About Hurricane Matthew As It Prepares To Slam Into The East Coast

hurricane-matthew-nasa-earth-science-officeThe worst storm to hit the United States since Hurricane Katrina is expected to slam into the east coast on Friday.  The governors of Florida, Georgia and South Carolina are strongly urging millions of people living in the evacuation zones to leave, but a lot of residents are choosing to not take this storm very seriously.  After about a decade of very low hurricane activity, a lot of people have forgotten how immensely destructive storms like this can be.  Inevitably, there will be damage to homes and businesses that could have been prevented by proper preparation, and there will be some very foolish people that will die because they chose to stay behind instead of evacuating.  Just like with so many other things, “normalcy bias” has lulled millions of Americans living in the Southeast into a false sense of security, and many of them will discover the foolishness of not taking storms like this seriously the hard way.  The following are 23 key facts about Hurricane Matthew as it prepares to slam into the east coast of the United States…

1. Hurricane Matthew is projected to be a Category 4 storm when it hits the Florida coastline.

2. According to the latest reports, Hurricane Matthew has sustained winds of 140 mph with gusts of up to 165 mph.

3. On early Friday morning, the storm surge is expected to peak at about 9 feet.

4. The National Weather Service is warning of “immense human suffering“.

5. Florida Governor Rick Scott has strongly warned everyone living in the evacuation zones to leave immediately.  In fact, he is openly telling the public that this storm “will kill you”.

6. It is being projected that this may be the biggest evacuation in the history of the state of Florida.

7. In some areas, bumper to bumper traffic is being reported on both sides of Interstate 95.

8. According to NBC News, there have been traffic jams since Tuesday as frightened residents try to flee the evacuation zones.

9. The death toll from Hurricane Matthew in the Caribbean is already in the triple digits.

10. Approximately 2 million people live in the evacuation zones in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina.

11. The city of Jacksonville, Florida sits right in the middle of the hurricane warning zone.

12. The projected path of the storm will take it right up the coastline until it hits southern North Carolina.

hurricane-matthew-noaa

13. So far, about 2,800 flights have been cancelled due to this storm.

14. Amtrak has also cancelled all train service into the affected areas.

15. Even Disney World has shut down due to the danger posed by Hurricane Matthew.

16. There are extremely long lines at gas stations throughout the Southeast, and there have already been some reports of stations running out of gasoline entirely.

17. Many retailers throughout the Southeast are totally sold out of bottled water at this point.

18. It is being projected that seven million people could be left without power by this storm.

19. A hurricane this immensely powerful can uproot trees, pick up large objects and hurl them like missiles, and even rip roofs entirely off of homes.

20. Despite all the warnings, many people have decided to stay put and ride out the storm.

21. Thousands of National Guard troops have already been deployed to help with evacuations.

22. I think that it is also interesting to note that less than 24 hours ago the Obama administration “strongly condemned” new Jewish settlement activity in the West Bank.  For those not familiar with the amazing connection between major natural disasters in the United States and U.S. meddling in the Middle East, please see this video.

23. These are the things that the Red Cross is urging people to do

  • Get a NOAA weather radio.
  • Stock up on batteries to run radios and flashlights.
  • Keep your vehicle’s tank as close to full as possible.
  • Create an evacuation plan — and practice it regularly.
  • Always keep at least a three-day supply of water and non-perishable foods on hand, along with at least a week’s worth of your prescription medications.
  • Make copies of your vital personal documents — like medication lists, medical records, passports and insurance papers — and keep them with you.

Wikipedia defines “normalcy bias” this way…

The normalcy bias, or normality bias, is a mental state people enter when facing a disaster. It causes people to underestimate both the possibility of a disaster and its possible effects. This may result in situations where people fail to adequately prepare and, on a larger scale, the failure of governments to include the populace in its disaster preparations.

The assumption that is made in the case of the normalcy bias is that since a disaster never has occurred, it never will occur. It can result in the inability of people to cope with a disaster once it occurs. People with a normalcy bias have difficulties reacting to something they have not experienced before. People also tend to interpret warnings in the most optimistic way possible, seizing on any ambiguities to infer a less serious situation.

Sadly, this perfectly describes how many in the Southeast are responding to Hurricane Matthew.

Because a highly destructive hurricane has not struck the region in many years, a lot of people are greatly underestimating what this storm could mean for them and their families.

Hopefully this article will persuade at least a few more people to evacuate.  You do not want to be in the middle of this storm when it hits.  It has already killed lots of people, and there are very few homes out there that are designed to withstand 140 mph winds.

And just because you aren’t in an evacuation area does not mean that this storm will not impact you and your family in a major way.  The course of this storm has been highly unusual, and it could still take some very unexpected twists and turns.  So if you live anywhere in the Southeast you need to be ready for anything.

Just remember what we witnessed during Hurricane Katrina.  This is the worst storm to hit the U.S. since that time, and let us just pray that it does not turn out to be as destructive as many experts are now projecting.

*About the author: Michael Snyder is the founder and publisher of The Economic Collapse Blog and End Of The American Dream. Michael’s controversial new book about Bible prophecy entitled “The Rapture Verdict” is available in paperback and for the Kindle on Amazon.com.*

Hurricane Arthur Now A Category 2 Storm With 100 MPH Winds As It Closes In On The East Coast

Hurricane Arthur East Coast - Public Domain

Vacationers hunkered down in hotels along the North Carolina coast Thursday evening as Hurricane Arthur grew into a Category 2 storm.

CNN severe weather expert Chad Myers said the storm was getting more dangerous as it developed an inner eye wall.

“That’s concerning, because the smaller the eye gets, the stronger the winds get,” he said.

Hurricane Arthur was bearing down on Morehead City, a popular vacation site for the Fourth of July.

“The dangerous part of this storm is going to travel right along the coast,” he said.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

North Carolina Governor: Leave ‘Stupid Hat’ Behind, Heed Warnings About Hurricane Arthur

Arthur strengthened to a hurricane early Thursday, taking aim at North Carolina’s thin ribbon of barrier islands on the Fourth of July holiday.

A mandatory evacuation of Hatteras Island, the easternmost strip of land in the Outer Banks, began at 5 a.m., about the time the National Hurricane Center upgraded the slow-moving tropical storm to hurricane status. Now no one is allowed on the island.

“We were just saying we were really, really lucky this year that the weather was so great, and then this,” said Nichole Specht, 27, who ended a two-week vacation with her fiance, Ryan Witman, 28. They left Hatteras Island at 3:30 a.m. to beat the traffic.

Hurricane Arthur - Public Domain

(Read the rest of the story here…)

Hurricane Arthur To Slam Into The Carolinas On The 4th Of July?

Hurricane Arthur - Public Domain

Arthur is forecast by AccuWeather to continue to strengthen and become a hurricane at midweek as it takes a northerly, then northeasterly path along the Atlantic coast of the United States.

During Thursday night into the morning hours of the Fourth of July, the center of Arthur will pass over or just east of North Carolina.

Later Friday, the center of Arthur is forecast to steer east of the mid-Atlantic.

During Saturday, Arthur may pass just to the southeast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Bernie Rayno discusses in the video below the track, intensity and impacts of Arthur that are pivotal for interests along the coast.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

Will A Hurricane Slam Into North Carolina On The 4th Of July?

Hurricane - Public Domain

Tropical Storm Arthur has formed east of Florida Tuesday morning with further strengthening likely as the system turns northward this week while hugging the East coast.

The AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center projects the system could also become the season’s first hurricane during the week of Independence Day as millions of people head to the beach for vacation.

AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Bernie Rayno discusses the potential impact along the eastern coast in the video below.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

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