A Tornado ‘Miraculously’ Changed Direction Just Before It Was Going To Slam Into A Children’s Hospital

Did we just witness a major miracle?  That is what some people are claiming after a tornado was miraculously redirected just before it was about to hit a children’t hospital in Dayton, Ohio.  The following comes from CBN

A twister that struck Dayton, Ohio on Memorial Day suddenly swerved from its path which could have been a direct hit on a children’s hospital.

“Miraculously, I do not know how this happened, but we are grateful it went around Children’s Hospital,” Dayton Fire Chief Jeffrey Payne told the Dayton Daily News. “It amazes me. It was going in a trajectory straight for the hospital and went in a different direction before it got there.”

The Dayton Daily News reports, “Given the extent of the tornado’s devastation, officials said it’s ‘miraculous’ no one was killed or seriously injured. The word ‘miracle’ surfaced time and again Tuesday.”

This Is Not “Normal”: There Have Been More Than 500 Tornadoes In The U.S. During The Last 30 Days

The mainstream media has been using the term “uncharted territory” to describe the unusual tornado outbreaks that have been happening in the middle of the country, but I don’t think that truly captures the historic nature of what we are witnessing. Over the last 30 days, there have been more than 500 tornadoes in the United States. That is not normal. In fact, Tuesday was the 12th day in a row when at least eight tornadoes were spawned, and that is a new all-time record. Community after community in the Midwest now looks like a “war zone”, and billions upon billions of dollars of damage has already been done. But this crisis is far from over, because forecasters are telling us that more powerful storms will roar through the middle of the country on Wednesday.

Since 1998, there has been an average of 279 tornadoes during the month of May. So the fact that we have had more than 500 over the last 30 days means that we are running way, way above normal

In the last week alone, the authorities have linked tornadoes to at least seven deaths and scores of injuries. Federal government weather forecasters logged preliminary reports of more than 500 tornadoes in a 30-day period — a rare figure, if the reports are ultimately verified — after the start of the year proved mercifully quiet.

The barrage continued Tuesday night, as towns and cities across the Midwest took shelter from powerful storms. Tornadoes carved a line of devastation from eastern Kansas through Missouri, ripping trees and power lines in Lawrence, Kan., southwest of Kansas City, and pulverizing houses in nearby Linwood.

According to the National Weather Service, there were more than 50 tornadoes over Memorial Day weekend alone, and at this point there have been at least 8 tornadoes in the U.S. for 12 consecutive days

Tuesday was the 12th consecutive day with at least eight tornado reports, breaking the record, according to Dr. Marsh. The storms have drawn their fuel from two sources: a high-pressure area that pulled the Gulf of Mexico’s warm, moist air into the central United States, where it combined with the effects of a trough trapped over the Rockies, which included strong winds.

The devastation that has been left behind by these storms has been immense. When Dayton assistant fire chief Nicholas Hosford appeared on ABC’s “Good Morning America”, he told viewers that in his city there are “homes flattened, entire apartment complexes destroyed, businesses throughout our community where walls have collapsed”.

Countless numbers of Americans have had their lives completely turned upside down, and of course the Midwest has already been reeling from unprecedented flooding in recent months.

So far this year, much of the focus has been on the historic flooding along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, but now severe flooding along the Arkansas River is threatening to break all-time records

Heavy rainfall over the past few weeks is threatening all-time May records and swelling rivers to record levels in parts of Arkansas and Oklahoma.

The National Weather Service in Little Rock, Arkansas, didn’t mince words Sunday, expecting historic, record flooding along the Arkansas River from Toad Suck Reservoir northwest of Little Rock to the Oklahoma border that could have impacts lasting well into the summer.

In fact, USA Today is plainly stating that both states are “bracing for their worst-ever flooding”…

Oklahoma and Arkansas were bracing for their worst-ever flooding as a new wave of storms forecast to roll through the region threatened to further bloat the Arkansas River that already has reached record crests in some areas.

Forecasters reported tornadoes, high winds, hail and heavy rain across the region on Monday, triggering evacuations and high-water rescues. The storms are the latest to rip through the Midwest over the past two weeks, leaving at least nine dead and a trail of damage from high winds and flooding.

Of course let us not forget what is happening along the Mississippi River either. The flooding has been called “the worst in over 90 years”, and in some parts of the river new records are already being set

For example, In Vicksburg, Mississippi, the river went above flood stage on Feb. 17, and has remained in flood ever since. The weather service said this is the longest continuous stretch above flood stage since 1927.

In Baton Rouge, Louisiana, the Mississippi first rose above flood stage in early January, and has been above that level ever since, the National Weather Service said. If this record-long stretch extends well into June, it would break the record from 1927, according to the Weather Channel.

And farther north, the Mississippi River at the Quad Cities of Iowa and Illinois saw its longest stretch above major flood stage ever recorded, even surpassing that of 1927.

None of this is “normal”, and prior to the month of May we had already witnessed the wettest 12 months in all of U.S. history.

All of this wet weather has been absolutely disastrous for Midwest farmers, and so far in 2019 agricultural production is way, way below expectations. In the months ahead, we should all be prepared for much higher prices at the grocery store.

Unfortunately, more wet weather is on the way. According to the Weather Channel, another series of very powerful storms will rip through the middle of the country on Wednesday…

Strong to severe thunderstorms are expected through Tuesday night from Iowa to Oklahoma, which may produce areas of locally heavy rain and flash flooding. Some clusters of storms may persist into Wednesday morning in the Ozarks.

Then, another rash of thunderstorms with heavy rain is expected Wednesday and Wednesday night from North Texas into Oklahoma, Arkansas and southern Missouri that could only trigger more flash flooding and aggravate ongoing river flooding.

Weather patterns are going absolutely crazy, and we have never seen a year quite like this in modern American history.

So what is going to happen if weather patterns get even crazier and natural disasters just continue to become even more frequent and even more powerful?

You may want to start thinking about that, because that is exactly what many people believe is going to happen.

Get Prepared NowAbout the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally-syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including Get Prepared Now, The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters. His articles are originally published on The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News. From there, his articles are republished on dozens of other prominent websites. If you would like to republish his articles, please feel free to do so. The more people that see this information the better, and we need to wake more people up while there is still time.

Tornadoes rip through New Orleans area, decimating homes and neighborhoods

Tornadoes ripped through southern Louisiana on Tuesday, leaving only splintered wood where houses once stood and causing dozens of minor injuries as a violent weather system barreled across the South.

There were no immediate reports of deaths after four tornadoes hit southeastern Louisiana, leaving 10,000 homes without power and prompting Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards to declare a state of emergency.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

Wildfires And Tornadoes In December? Two More Major Disasters Hit America

Tornado Destruction - Public Domain

It is not normal for the United States to experience massive wildfires and giant tornadoes right around Christmas.  The huge wildfire that erupted northwest of Los Angeles on Christmas Day and the devastating tornadoes that ripped through the Dallas area on Saturday can be added to a growing list of freakish disasters that have hit the United States since the month of September.  So why in the world is this happening?  Many are blaming the worst El Nino pattern that we have seen in at least 15 years.  Right now we are witnessing very strange weather all over the world, including an unprecedented heat wave in Australia and the worst flooding in South America in 50 years.  And it is true that El Ninos have significantly disrupted weather patterns in the past.  But is the current El Nino really to blame for everything that we have been seeing?  Because without a doubt, the last few months have been truly bizarre.

For example, who has ever heard of a giant wildfire erupting on Christmas Day?

That is precisely what happened this year in southern California.  A mammoth blaze that quickly engulfed more than 1,200 acres erupted near Ventura, California, and it shut down both the Pacific Coast Highway and U.S. 101 for an extended period of time.

This was truly a frightening fire.  You can watch some amazing footage of a family actually driving through the wildfire right here.  Fortunately, firefighters seem to be getting the blaze under control at this point.

I have written repeatedly about how this was shaping up to be the worst year for wildfires in U.S. history, but just like everyone else I had assumed that wildfire season was over by now.  For a fire of this magnitude to erupt in southern California at this time of the year is definitely unusual.

The day after this fire erupted, at least 11 people died as 11 deadly tornadoes ripped through the Dallas, Texas area.

Isn’t it funny how “11” just keeps popping up everywhere?  I don’t know what it means, but I just thought that I would mention it.

Authorities have estimated that as many as 1,000 homes and buildings were destroyed by these tornadoes.  The tornado that shredded parts of Garland was categorized as an “EF-4”, and it had winds “of at least 166 mph”

The tornado that roared through Garland was rated an EF-4, with winds of at least 166 mph, the National Weather Service said Sunday. This is the USA’s first EF-4 tornado to strike in December in 15 years. It is also the farthest west a tornado of that strength has formed in December, according to the tornado research site U.S. Tornadoes.

For Dallas County, it’s only the second EF-4 tornado ever recorded since accurate records began in 1950.

Some news outlets are reporting that the tornado actually had peak winds somewhere in the neighborhood of 200 mph.  If it seems strange to you that something like this would happen during the month of December in the state of Texas, that is because it is very strange.  As the article quoted above noted, we haven’t seen any EF-4 tornadoes in the entire country in December in 15 years, and it was only the second EF-4 tornado to hit Dallas County since 1950.

Meanwhile, as I mentioned at the outset of this article, other areas of the planet are experiencing very bizarre weather right now as well.  For instance, just check out what is going on in South America.  According to the BBC, quite a few South American nations are currently being hit by the worst flooding that they have seen “in 50 years”…

Vast areas in Paraguay, Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil are being hit by the worst flooding in 50 years, forcing the evacuation of more than 150,000 people.

Days of heavy rains brought on by the El Nino weather phenomenon have caused three major rivers to swell, and officials report at least six deaths.

A state of emergency is in force in Paraguay, the worst hit nation, where 130,000 people have fled their homes.

In northern Argentina, some 20,000 people have left their homes.

If you just look at one of these disasters in isolation, it may not seem like that big of a deal.

After all, there are significant natural disasters every year.

But collectively, all of these strange disasters seem to indicate that something truly unique is happening.  I cannot recall ever seeing the U.S. (and much of the rest of the world) being hit by so many wildfires, floods, historic droughts, earthquakes and major volcanic eruptions in such a short period of time.

Perhaps things will eventually settle down and this stretch will be considered a strange anomaly by this time next year.

Perhaps things will go back to “normal” very soon.

But what if they don’t?

What if they just keep getting worse?

Personally, all of this strange weather is something that I am watching very, very closely.  I am convinced that our planet is becoming increasingly unstable, and I expect weather patterns to become even more wild and even more unpredictable as we roll into 2016.

So what do you think?

Please feel free to join the discussion by posting a comment below…

 

3-hour Canadian tornado may have been a world record

Tornado - Photo by Justin Hobson

The massive tornado that roared across the Canadian province of Manitoba late Monday was on the ground for nearly 3 hours — likely one of the longest-lasting on record in Canada and perhaps the world. No injuries or deaths were reported.

The longest tornado recorded is the infamous Tri-State tornado that lasted for about 3.5 hours, ravaging the Midwest in March 1925 and leaving hundreds of people dead in its wake.

“The path length distance of the Manitoba tornado might be shorter, but the duration may be comparable,” Randy Cerveny, rapporteur of climate and weather extremes for the World Meteorological Organization, said, referring to reports that the Canadian tornado may not have moved as far distance wise as the 1925 twister.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

The U.S. is having the deadliest July for tornadoes since the 1970s

Oklahoma Tornado Damage

The ferocious tornado that roared through a campground in Virginia on Thursday morning, killing two people, raised the national death toll for July tornadoes up to six.

That’s the most tornado deaths in July since 1978, when tornadoes killed 11 people that month, according to meteorologist Harold Brooks of the National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, Okla.

The worst July for tornadoes was 1893, Brooks said, when 73 people were killed. Tornado death tolls were typically much higher in the late 1800s and early 1900s before the advent of modern forecasting techniques.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

‘It was like God dragged two fingernails across the land’: Terrifying 200MPH tornado cluster levels Nebraska town

A deadly duo of massive, relentlessly fast-moving tornadoes rained down terror in northeast Nebraska on Monday evening.

Photos from the tiny town of Pilger, Nebraska show a community devastated after 200MPH winds ripped though and leveled entire neighborhoods, gutted the town’s middle school and destroyed it’s Farmer’s Co-Op and much of its farming infrastructure as corn silos crumpled in the face of the winds.

As Monday evening turned to night, two casualties had been reported, with at least 16 critically injured in the area. At least one of those killed was a child.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

Tornado - Photo by Justin Hobson

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