Corn Is In Trouble. Big Trouble. And It Matters To All Of Us…

(USA Today) This time of year, Ohio’s farmland should be alive and brand new again, peppered with the pop of bright green corn stalks already reaching the height of a tall man’s shins. Instead, standing water comes up to the knee in some fields. Plots are more like muddy swamps where the only thing that’s growing is mold and disease and mosquitoes.  (Read More…)

Torrential Rain Of Biblical Proportions Is Causing Immense Devastation For Midwest Farmers

The wettest 12 months in all of U.S. history was followed by the second wettest May on record, and for some parts of the Midwest the month of June will be even worse. Some portions of Ohio and Indiana have gotten 10 more inches of rain since Friday, and more rain is literally falling on the Midwest as I write this article. When I describe what we have witnessed as “torrential rain of Biblical proportions”, I am not exaggerating even a little bit. Even before we got to the month of June, farmers in the middle of the country were already dealing with a disaster unlike anything that they had ever experienced before. And just when everyone thought that it couldn’t possibly get any worse, it did. Since Friday, the rainfall totals in the Ohio Valley have been staggering

As much as 10 inches of rain has fallen in the Ohio Valley since Friday, causing flooding, necessitating water rescues and creating a mudslide near Lexington, Kentucky.

Parts of southern Indiana have seen 10 inches of rain, while up to half a foot fell in parts of Ohio. Other parts of Kentucky have reported 5 inches.

More rain is coming for the rest of the week, and that is exceptionally bad news for Midwest farmers.

At this point, millions of acres that farmers had intended to plant with corn will go completely unused. And according to a Washington Post article that was republished by MSN, corn futures are surging because traders are anticipating “an impending shortage” of corn…

Ohio trailed behind, with 68 percent of its corn planted, South Dakota had 78 percent, and Michigan and Indiana each had 84 percent of their hoped-for acres planted. Last week, the USDA lowered the projected total yield to 13.68 billion bushels (last year’s corn yield was 14.3 billion bushels). And as of Monday, in anticipation of an impending shortage, corn futures continued to trade at their highest level since June 2014.

I know that the USDA is projecting that somehow we will get to 13.68 billion bushels of corn, but a lot of experts are convinced that the USDA’s reduced projection is still wildly optimistic.

In some parts of the heartland, it literally looks like a hurricane just came through. When Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Dorothy Pelanda recently toured farms in her state, she saw fields that were “filled with water and weeds instead of crops”

“I visited with several farmers this week and saw firsthand the impact of this devastating rainfall. Fields are visibly filled with water and weeds instead of crops,” states Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Dorothy Pelanda in the press release.

And for Ohio farmer Charles Kettering, hundreds of acres that he recently planted with corn and soybeans can’t be seen at all because they are currently underwater

As much as a third of the 800 acres of corn and soybeans that Kettering planted a few weeks ago is currently underwater. The chances of that part of his crop surviving are next to nothing. As little as a full day underwater is enough to kill off whatever he planted. The deluge of heavy rain in late May and early June flooded much of the area’s fertile farmland, including Kettering’s acreage, which sits in the bottom of a valley.

As a result of the flooding here in June, the Ketterings will lose approximately $100,000.

Could you imagine how you would feel if you were suddenly hit with a financial loss of that magnitude?

Other farmers will be hit with huge losses at the end of the season when yields are way down. Thanks to the absolutely horrific weather, it is being projected that yields could be down by more than 50 percent for some Ohio farmers…

For those planting corn in June, yield losses are likely—even if the grower has switched to a shorter-season variety, said Peter Thomison, a corn field specialist with CFAES. The losses hinge on growing conditions after planting, but they could be more than 50% for some farmers, he said.

In the end, there is no way that we are going to come anywhere close to the 14.3 billion bushels of corn that was harvested in the U.S. last year, and that is going to have ripple effects that are going to last for a very long time.

For many Midwest farmers, this will be their last year in operation. Farm bankruptcies had already risen to the highest level since the last recession even before all of this rain, and this unprecedented disaster will be the final nail in the coffin for a lot of farms that have been teetering on the brink.

According to one recent survey, it is expected that the number of farm loan defaults over the next year will be double what we saw in 2017

Midwestern bankers are tightening the purse strings on farm credit lines amid some of the toughest financial times for farmers in decades.

A survey of bank CEOs by Creighton University’s Heider College of Business found they expect the percentage of farm loan defaults over the next 12 months in a number of Midwestern states, including Illinois, to be double the default rates for 2017.

I keep warning that our planet is becoming increasingly unstable and that global weather patterns are changing dramatically. Midwest farmers are desperately hoping for some drier weather, but instead a lot more rain is coming

Rain is in the forecast every day this week until Friday, and then we have a break over the weekend with more rain coming in Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday of next week.

The true scope of this crisis will not be fully known until harvest time rolls around, but right now the outlook for U.S. agricultural production in 2019 is exceedingly grim.

Perhaps things will soon dry out and we will have picture perfect weather for the rest of the growing season. If that happens, it will definitely help matters greatly.

But there is also the possibility that Midwest farmers could be hammered by extreme rain, extreme heat and/or an early frost.

Sadly, at this point it certainly wouldn’t take very much to turn an exceedingly bad growing season into a catastrophic one.

Get Prepared NowAbout the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally-syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including Get Prepared Now, The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters. His articles are originally published on The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News. From there, his articles are republished on dozens of other prominent websites. If you would like to republish his articles, please feel free to do so. The more people that see this information the better, and we need to wake more people up while there is still time.

Floods And Drought Devastate Crops All Over The Planet – Could A Global Food Crisis Be Coming?

It looks like global food production could be well below expectations in 2019, and that could spell big trouble in the months ahead. In recent weeks, I have written extensively about the problems that we have been experiencing here in the United States. As many as a million calves were lost to the flooding that hit the state of Nebraska in March, farmers have planted less than half of the corn that is normally in the ground by this time of the year, and a lot of the crops that have been planted in the middle of the country are really struggling due to extremely wet soil. But it isn’t just the United States that is facing a very troubling year. Earlier today, one of my readers sent me an article entitled “Global food crisis ahead as extreme weather events devastate crops and fields around the world” which I would encourage everyone to read. In that article, we are told that after the worst drought in 116 years Australia has actually been forced to import wheat. And according to the Guardian, this is the first time in 12 years that this has happened…

Australia is planning to import wheat for the first time in 12 years after drought across the eastern states saw grain production fall 20% last year.

The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources confirmed this week it had issued a bulk import permit to allow wheat to be brought in from Canada to be processed for the domestic market.

Normally, Australia exports a tremendous amount of wheat.

In fact, they were the fifth largest exporter of wheat in the entire world last year.

But now they are having to bring wheat in from Canada, and that is a very ominous sign.

The article on Strange Sounds also detailed crop failures in Italy, France, Mexico and Argentina. I will not reproduce all of that information here.

But one major crop failure that was missed in that article is the massive rice crop failure in the Philippines

More than P350 million worth of damage on rice crops due to drought was recorded by the Office of the Provincial Agriculturist (OPA)-Capiz.

Per damage assessment report as of May 10, OPA information officer Florie May Castro said the damage on rice crops already reached P358,452,650 in the entire province of Capiz due to the dry spell.

All over the world, crops are being devastated by floods, drought and colder than expected temperatures, and many are desperately hoping for a return to normalcy for global weather patterns.

Things are particularly bad in North Korea. At this point, hardly any rain at all has fallen so far in 2019…

The rainfall is the lowest amount since 1982. Thus far in May, North Korea has seen 0.02 inches of rain. However, Pyongyang City, Nampho City, Kangwon Province and North and South Hwanghae provinces have seen no rainfall.

According to KCNA, if precipitation for the rest of May does not exceed 50% of the average annual precipitation, North Korea’s January to May rainfall totals will be about 3 inches, the lowest amount ever recorded for that time period.

With so little rain, farmers have had an exceedingly difficult time growing anything at all, and at this point the nation is facing an enormous food deficit

Adding to the struggles is a widespread food shortage. The United Nations reported earlier this month that North Korea has a food deficit of 1.36 million metric tons. The 2018-2019 food crop production is an estimated 4.9 million metric tons, the lowest since the 2008-2009 season.

On top of everything else, let us not forget that African Swine Fever is absolutely devastating the global pig population.

According to the Hill, it is being projected that 200 million hogs could die from the disease in China alone…

Pork prices are expected rise as African swine fever decimates Chinese pigs, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday.

McDonald’s, Burger King, Jimmy Dean and Dunkin’ all reportedly expect sausage and bacon prices to rise this year as China has to import pigs to make up for the 200 million hogs that are expected to die from the disease.

To put that in perspective, that is more pigs than the entire U.S. pork industry produces in an entire year. For much more on this ongoing crisis, please see my previous article entitled ‘“An Estimated 150-200 Million Pigs” Have Been Hit By A Global Plague Of Biblical Proportions’.

Here in the United States, endless rain and unprecedented flooding have been the biggest problems. The previous 12 months have been the wettest in all of U.S. history, and the middle of the country just got hammered by yet another series of severe storms

Heavy rain, high winds and hail has swept across the central states, bringing devastation to the region during a brutally wet spring period, leaving 22 million people braced for more flash flooding.

Four million residents were under a flash flood ’emergency warning’ on Tuesday morning, including in Oklahoma, where as much as five feet of water entered homes in Hominy, to the northeast of the state.

Some 22 tornadoes have been reported so far across Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas and Missouri, while rescue crews in boats pulled at least 50 people from flood waters as heavy downpours inundated roads and homes, said Oklahoma Emergency Management Agency.

Our planet is changing, and global weather patterns are going to keep shifting. The “new normal” is going to look a whole lot different from the “old normal”, and we all need to get prepared for a very uncertain future.

Even during the good years, the world has really struggled to feed everyone.

Now that we are facing catastrophic crop failures all over the planet, what will we do?

Many believe that a global food crisis is looming, and without a doubt U.S. consumers will soon be paying much higher prices when they visit the grocery store.

Get Prepared NowAbout the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally-syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including Get Prepared Now, The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters. His articles are originally published on The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News. From there, his articles are republished on dozens of other prominent websites. If you would like to republish his articles, please feel free to do so. The more people that see this information the better, and we need to wake more people up while there is still time.

What Is Causing Extremely Bizarre Weather Patterns To Hammer The Middle Of The U.S. Over And Over Again?

The middle of the country has never seen anything quite like this. As 2019 began, the central portion of the nation was relentlessly hammered by bitter cold and massive snow storms, and many were hoping for better things once spring arrived. But then in March the flooding began, and it hasn’t stopped since. In fact, this is already the longest we have seen flooding along the Mississippi River since 1927, and there is no end in sight. By the time it is all said and done, all of the old records will probably be completely shattered. Meanwhile, powerful storms continue to pound the heartland every few days. Over the weekend, huge storms struck the middle of the country on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, and more are expected on Monday. So what is causing such extremely bizarre weather to happen? Is there a reason why weather patterns have shifted so dramatically, or is all of this just a really, really strange coincidence?

Nobody can possibly claim that what we are witnessing is “normal”. According to the the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the last year has been the “wettest 12-month period in recorded history” for the lower 48 states…

The continental United States just recorded its wettest 12-month period in recorded history, while also moving one step closer to being drought-free, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Needless to say, all of this wet weather has caused a tremendous amount of flooding, and at this point this is the longest-lasting Mississippi River flood since 1927

Mississippi River flooding has been ongoing for three months or longer in some locations, making it the longest-lasting flood there since the Great Flood of 1927, the worst flood in modern history on the lower Mississippi River.

Take Vicksburg, Mississippi, for example.

The Mississippi River went above flood stage there on Feb. 17, and has remained in flood ever since. The National Weather Service said this is the longest continuous stretch above flood stage since 1927 at Vicksburg.

And since there is no end in sight for the flooding, all of the old records may end up being broken by a very wide margin.

Very weird weather is happening out west too. In fact, several feet of snow just fell in the mountains of California

Parts of California still resemble a scene out of winter, with a series of storms bringing several feet of snow to mountain areas, ahead of a “significant” severe weather threat across the nation’s midsection.

The National Weather Service said that a series of Pacific storms are bringing heavy rain, mountain snow, and gusty winds across the West. A winter storm warning was issued Wednesday night that will run through Friday morning for the southern Sierra Nevada.

In every year there are moments of bad weather. But that isn’t what we are talking about. In 2019, it is as if we are being hit with a sledgehammer day after day after day.

Of course this has been absolutely disastrous for agricultural production. At this point, U.S. farmers have planted less than half the corn that they were expected to plant by now. For much more on this, please see my previous article entitled “Total Catastrophe For U.S. Corn Production: Only 30% Of U.S. Corn Fields Have Been Planted – 5 Year Average Is 66%”.

We like to think that we are not vulnerable to the vagaries of the weather thanks to all of our advanced technology, but that is not true at all.

And over the weekend, things got even worse.

Starting on Friday and Saturday, a string of immensely powerful storms devastated communities all over the Midwest

A plethora of tornado reports began rolling in Friday in Nebraska and Kansas. On Saturday, almost a dozen were reported in Texas and Oklahoma. In Texas, the National Weather Service Abilene/San Angelo concluded that an EF2 tornado with winds of up to 135 mph damage homes in San Angelo.

Dru Lewis was hunkered down with his family as the storm battered his home.

“There was a suction … from under the door, I could feel it,” he said. “Then all the windows just exploded. It was just chaos from there until the storm died down.”

Then on Sunday, more huge storms produced literally dozens of tornadoes across the region…

Severe thunderstorms continued to rumble across parts of the U.S. Sunday, damaging buildings in Louisiana after spawning more than three dozen reports of tornadoes across five states.

Several homes and businesses were damaged and power lines and trees were down throughout Evangeline Parish, Louisiana, after severe thunderstorms and possible tornadoes moved through the area early Sunday morning. The town of Ville Platte, about 76 miles northwest of Baton Rouge, was especially hard hit.

Unfortunately, there is still more to come. In fact, an entirely new weather system will hit the middle of the country on Monday

On Monday, a new system will develop off the High Plains and slide east into the Southern Plains. The dry line will interact with an increasingly moist and unstable air mass that will develop across parts of Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.

Unfortunately, that means very favorable conditions for violent severe weather in parts of this region.

We are being told that the storms on Monday could affect nearly 50 million people.

For a long time I have been warning that global weather patterns are dramatically changing, but at first a lot of people wanted to argue that it wasn’t true.

Well, these days the number of people that want to claim that I am wrong has gone way down.

Of course throughout all of human history weather patterns have always been changing, and so change isn’t something that is new.

But the changes that we are witnessing in our time appear to be taking an apocalyptic turn, and nobody is exactly sure what is going to happen next…

Get Prepared NowAbout the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally-syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including Get Prepared Now, The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters. His articles are originally published on The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News. From there, his articles are republished on dozens of other prominent websites. If you would like to republish his articles, please feel free to do so. The more people that see this information the better, and we need to wake more people up while there is still time.

Only 9 Percent Of Households In South Carolina And Only 3 Percent Of Households In North Carolina Have Flood Insurance

A lot of people are going to be financially ruined by Hurricane Florence. As you will see below, only 9 percent of all homeowners in South Carolina have flood insurance, and up in North Carolina that figure drops to just 3 percent. That means that well over 90 percent of the people that will be affected by this storm do not have any financial protection against flooding whatsoever. Florence is expected to slowly churn over the region for the next several days, and it is being projected that this massive storm could dump up to 10 trillion gallons of water on the Carolinas. Needless to say, that amount of water is going to do an extraordinary amount of damage, and thousands upon thousands of households are at risk of losing everything because they aren’t carrying insurance.

Paying insurance premiums can seem like a giant waste until the day comes when you actually need it.

If you live anywhere near the east coast, not having flood insurance is not very wise. But unfortunately, that is the situation most homeowners in the Carolinas find themselves in. According to an analysis conducted by McClatchy, only a very small percentage of households in both North Carolina and South Carolina currently have flood insurance…

Thousands of homeowners in inland North and South Carolina stand to be inundated by Hurricane Florence’s drenching over the next few days, but hardly any of them carry federal flood insurance, leaving them at risk of a devastating loss, with little prospect of help from the federal government.

A McClatchy analysis of federal data shows that in the coastal counties, a relatively high percentage of households carry flood insurance policies, but the percentage drops off just a few miles inland. Overall, only 9 percent of households in South Carolina and 3 percent in North Carolina carried federal flood insurance as of mid-2017, according to National Flood Insurance Program data reviewed by McClatchy.

And flooding along coastal areas has already begun.

In fact, it was being reported that at least 150 people had to be rescued in New Bern, North Carolina alone…

Nearly 12 hours after city officials in New Bern, North Carolina, reported that 150 people needed rescue there, that number is unchanged. Some of those who were stranded overnight have been rescued, but new ones needing rescue have been discovered, said New Bern Mayor Dana Outlaw.

The Neuse River has flooded New Bern and Craven County, where the Neuse and Trent rivers meet, forcing some residents who stayed behind amid evacuation orders ahead of Hurricane Florence to wait in attics or on the roofs of their houses to be rescued by boat.

During storms of this magnitude, the water can move extremely quickly. One resident of New Bern went to sleep on Thursday night thinking that everything that was fine, and he awoke to “waves crashing down” around his house…

Tom Ballance said his wife went to Atlanta and he stayed behind in their New Bern home with their three dogs and a cat. At around 3:30 p.m. Thursday, the electricity went out. By midnight, his rain gauge showed that he’d gotten 9 inches of rain since mid-afternoon. He drifted off to sleep. About 40 minutes later, he woke and went to a sun room, where he’d boarded up all the windows except for a small hole. He shone a flashlight through the glass.

“I about jumped out of my skin,” he told The Associated Press in a telephone interview Friday morning. “These were waves crashing down.”

And even though this storm was not as bad as initially feared, people are still being killed

In the first report of storm-related fatalities, a mother and infant died after a tree fell on a house in Wilmington, North Carolina, according to local police. The father was hospitalized with injuries.

In addition, a woman in Hampstead suffered a heart attack Friday morning, but emergency crews could not reach her before she died because of downed trees in the road, ABC News reports.

A fourth person was killed while plugging in a generator in Lenoir County, north of Wilmington, according to WITN-TV, quoting the governor’s office.

At this point, a total of at least five people have died, and many more have been injured.

How bad would have things been if Florence had come ashore as a Category 4 or Category 5 storm?

This is yet another example that shows that the American people are woefully unprepared for when emergency situations disrupt the flow of normal life. I co-authored an entire book about getting prepared, and so many others have put out really great resources, but most people just aren’t listening.

Most Americans only have a few days of food at home, no extra water and are living right on the edge financially.

When a long-term major emergency strikes this nation, most of the population will be out of food, water and money almost immediately.

And so what happens if the government is unwilling or unable to pick up the pieces for everybody?

It is only a matter of time before such a scenario plays out, and it will truly be a very dark day for America indeed.

About the author: Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

This Has Been The Worst 12 Months For Floods In U.S. History

Louisiana Flood - Public Domain

Since last October, the United States has been hit by “historic flood” after “historic flood”, and this latest flooding down in Louisiana that is making headlines all over the world has been caused by a “500 year storm“.  Even before some areas of the state received more than 30 inches of rain, this was already the worst 12 months for floods in U.S. history, but without a doubt this has put an exclamation mark on this exceedingly unusual stretch of flooding.  There are some rivers down in Louisiana that have crested three to four feet higher than their previous all-time records, and Governor Edwards is using the words “unprecedented” and “historic” to describe these floods.  So far, 20,000 people have been rescued by authorities, and Governor Edwards even had to evacuate the Governor’s Mansion due to chest-high water in the basement.

So why is this happening?

Why are we being hammered by historic flood after historic flood?

One of the most amazing images from the flooding down in Louisiana was of caskets that had been washed up from a graveyard that were literally floating down the street.  Meteorologists are telling us that the storm that brought all of this rain was essentially equivalent to a tropical storm

As meteorologist Tim Destri with the NWS New Orleans/Baton Rouge office explains it, a low pressure system forms near the surface bringing deep tropical moisture from the warmer water in the Caribbean — almost like a hurricane but without the wind and the name.

“Everything came together just right like it would with a tropical weather system,” Destri said.

Destri went on to compare the damage caused by this storm to Hurricane Katrina…

“This probably ranked up there with some of the top rainfall-producing systems in history,” Destri said. “Damage is really significant, I mean extreme, because it’s been so devastating with some houses just completely inundated, just scenes like Katrina almost.”

In fact, in some areas the damage was even worse than we saw during Hurricane Katrina.  According to the Washington Post, one resident said that this flooding was “the worst situation I’ve ever been through“.

And unfortunately, it isn’t over yet.  More rain was forecast for today, and that is going to make the flooding even worse.

They will be talking about this current flood down in Louisiana for many years to come, and we will add this flood to the other historic floods on my ongoing list from previous articles

October: Hurricane Joaquin never makes landfall, but it tracks up the east coast of the United States causing nightmarish rainfall and flooding all over the eastern seaboard. Things were particularly bad in South Carolina, where the governor declared that it was the worst rainfall that many areas of her state had seen in 1,000 years.

October: Violent storms in southern California caused flash flooding that buried some highways in “rivers of mud” that were up to six feet deep. Hundreds of vehicles got buried in the fast moving mud, and the lifeless body of one man that had his vehicle completely encased by several feet of mud was recovered only after a few days had passed because that is how long it took emergency workers to dig him out.

October: Hurricane Patricia was the second most intense tropical cyclone ever recorded in the entire world, and remnants from that storm caused absolutely horrible flooding in some parts of Texas. The flood waters were moving so fast at one point that a freight train was actually knocked entirely off the tracks.

November-December: A “conveyor belt” of violent storms barreled into coastal areas of Oregon and Washington causing nightmarish flooding in many areas. The resulting landslides and floods made headlines all over the country, and it is going to be a long time before the region fully recovers. In early December we witnessed the wettest day in the history of Portland, Oregon, and things were also extremely bad at that time up in the Seattle area.

January: The middle part of the country experienced record-breaking flooding as the calendar rolled over from 2015 to 2016. The only thing that people could really compare it to was the great flood of 1993, and Missouri Governor Jay Nixon said that some communities saw floodwaters get to “places they’ve never been before”. Normally, if the middle of the country is going to see flooding like this it is going to take place when the snow begins to thaw in the spring. For something like this to happen in the middle of the winter was absolutely unprecedented.

January: On January 22nd, one of the worst east coast blizzards in history slammed into Washington D.C., New York City and other major metropolitan areas. More than three feet of snow was dumped on some areas, hundreds of thousands of people were left without power, and coastal cities all long the eastern seaboard experienced flooding that was described as “worse than Hurricane Sandy“. It is also interesting to note that this storm was known as “Jonas”, which is actually a Greek transliteration of the Hebrew name “Jonah”. Jonah, of course, was a Hebrew prophet that was sent to the capital city of Assyria (Ninevah) to warn that the judgment of God was coming. Well, it turns out that this storm called Jonas also hit our capital city (Washington D.C.) on the exact anniversary of Roe v. Wade and in the exact location where Roe v. Wade was decided.

March: Almost two feet of rain triggered historic flooding in parts of Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi. Flooding along one area of the Sabine River broke the previous record by more than five feet, and some sections of Interstate 10 were closed for four days.

April: City officials in Houston declared that the flooding that struck that city was “a life-threatening emergency“, and substantial sections of Interstate 10 and Interstate 45 near downtown were fully underwater. Authorities admitted that water was getting to areas that it had never been before, and Fire Department spokesman Jay Evans said that the water was 10 to 15 feet deep in some areas.

May: Long stretches of Interstate 95 were shut down in South Carolina after Tropical Storm Bonnie dumped massive amounts of rain on the state. At the time, Lance Cpl. Matt Southern of the South Carolina Highway Patrol told reporters that “we are at the mercy of mother nature”.

June: Extremely heavy rain caused the Brazos River in Texas to hit its highest level “in more than a century“, and many parts of Houston found themselves under water yet once again.  According to CNN, this was “the second year in a row that Texas has been hit by 500-year floods”…

“It could just be really bad luck,” said CNN Senior Meteorologist Brandon Miller. “A 500-year flood doesn’t mean you will go 500 years between them. It just means it is such an extreme event that the odds of it happening are very low, therefore it only happens on average every 500 years.

“It just so happens that parts of Texas have seen them now in back-to-back years, and maybe even twice this year. The odds of that happening are infinitesimally small.”

June: West Virginia was hit by the deadliest flash flood in the United States in six years, and 23 people died as a result.  The following comes from Wikipedia

On June 23, 2016, a flood hit areas of the U.S. state of West Virginia and nearby parts of Virginia, resulting in 23 deaths. The flooding was the result of 8 to 10 inches (200 to 250 mm) of rain falling over a period of 12 hours, resulting in a flood tied for seventh among Deadliest floods in West Virginia history. It is also the deadliest flash flood event in the United States since the 2010 Tennessee floods.[2]

Meanwhile, horrible wildfires continue to rip through the state of California.  The latest major wildfire to make headlines all across the nation has literally reduced homes, offices and businesses to “smoldering rubble” in the little town of Lower Lake…

Entire streets have been reduced to smoldering rubble, and more than 175 buildings and other structures have been destroyed, as a Northern California wildfire continues to spread.

The fire about 100 miles north of San Francisco has so far spread to 3,000 acres and is 5 percent contained, officials said.

The blaze on Sunday swept into Lower Lake, a town of about 1,200 people, according to The Associated Press, where it burned buildings including a post office, a Habitat for Humanity office and a winery.

If you have read my latest book, you already know that 2015 was the worst year for wildfires in all of U.S. history.

So that seems like a very odd “coincidence” – we are being hit by the worst flooding in U.S. history at a time when we have also experienced the worst wildfires in U.S. history.

Is there some kind of a connection?

Why are all of these disasters happening to us one right after another?

Could it be possible that there is an explanation other than bad luck?

As you can probably guess, I have come to the conclusion that we are experiencing something that goes far beyond bad luck.  Just like many others out there, I believe that someone is trying to tell us something, but unfortunately most Americans are simply not paying attention.

*About the author: Michael Snyder is the founder and publisher of The Economic Collapse Blog and End Of The American Dream. Michael’s controversial new book about Bible prophecy entitled “The Rapture Verdict” is available in paperback and for the Kindle on Amazon.com.*

Last 10 Months Have Been The Worst Period For Floods AND The Worst Period For Fires In U.S. History

Wildfires 2016 - Public Domain

As you read this article, the state of California is being ravaged by gigantic wildfires that are raging wildly out of control, and West Virginia is dealing with a “500 year flood”. Since last September, the U.S. has been hit by a series of 11 historic floods. Never before in American history have we seen so many major floods within such a compressed space of time. And just as the Shemitah year ended last September, massive wildfires began erupting all over the country. Thanks to that unprecedented outbreak of large fires, 2015 ended up being the worst year for wildfires in all of U.S. history. And since 2016 began, things have continued to get worse. As far as the total number of acres burned is concerned, we are more than a million acres ahead of the pace that was set last year. So why in the world is all of this happening?

The wildfires that are ripping through many parts of California right now are making headlines all over the world. In particular, the extremely quick moving Erskine fire in Kern County has already destroyed more than 200 homes and authorities are picking through the rubble hoping that they won’t discover too many bodies

The charred remains of two people were found inside a burned down mobile home which went up in flames as the fire tore through the South Lake area of Sierra Nevada, officials said.

The bodies were so horrifically burned that a forensic investigation is required to determine whether they belonged to a human or animal, said Kern County Sheriff spokesman Ray Pruitt.

Officials warned that more residents may be forced to flee the advancing flames as the fire has already scorched more than 30,000 acres.

At this point more than 1,000 firefighters are fighting this enormous fire, and it has already burned more than 35,000 acres. The latest update that I saw said that it was now “10 percent contained”, and high temperatures in central California are expected to hit 110 degrees by mid-week.

Meanwhile, West Virginia is dealing with a “500 year flood” after it received approximately a quarter of its entire average annual rainfall in a single day.

The Elk River has already broken a record that has stood since 1888, and the Governor of West Virginia has declared a state of emergency for 44 of the 55 counties in the state.

According to Greenbrier County Sheriff Jan Cahill, the amount of damage that has already been done is unlike anything that has ever seen before

At least 24 people have died and crews are still searching for missing residents in West Virginia after heavy rains flooded several towns. A federal disaster has been declared for this devastating event that has been described as “complete chaos.”

Roads destroyed, bridges out, homes burned down, washed off foundations,” said Greenbrier County Sheriff Jan Cahill. “Multiple sections of highway just missing. Pavement just peeled off like a banana. I’ve never seen anything like that.”

Unfortunately, the worst is not over for West Virginia.

In fact, the state is about to get a whole lot more rain. The following comes from the Daily Mail

West Virginia is expected to be hit by another barrage of heavy rain and flood waters in the next 24 hours.

The National Weather Service in Charleston has issued a flash flood watch for 22 counties tomorrow, warning that heavy rain could cause streams to burst their banks.

Around 18,000 people are currently languishing without electricity three days after the floods wiped away entire neighborhoods, killing at least 26.

As the floodwaters receded today, some returned to find their homes, businesses and entire neighborhoods swept away by the devastating weather.

If you follow my work closely, then you know that this is just the latest in a truly bizarre series of unprecedented floods that have been striking all over the nation over the past 10 months.

So now we can add this West Virginia flood to all of the other historic floods on my ongoing list…

October: Hurricane Joaquin never makes landfall, but it tracks up the east coast of the United States causing nightmarish rainfall and flooding all over the eastern seaboard. Things were particularly bad in South Carolina, where the governor declared that it was the worst rainfall that many areas of her state had seen in 1,000 years.

October: Violent storms in southern California caused flash flooding that buried some highways in “rivers of mud” that were up to six feet deep. Hundreds of vehicles got buried in the fast moving mud, and the lifeless body of one man that had his vehicle completely encased by several feet of mud was recovered only after a few days had passed because that is how long it took emergency workers to dig him out.

October: Hurricane Patricia was the second most intense tropical cyclone ever recorded in the entire world, and remnants from that storm caused absolutely horrible flooding in some parts of Texas. The flood waters were moving so fast at one point that a freight train was actually knocked entirely off the tracks.

November-December: A “conveyor belt” of violent storms barreled into coastal areas of Oregon and Washington causing nightmarish flooding in many areas. The resulting landslides and floods made headlines all over the country, and it is going to be a long time before the region fully recovers. In early December we witnessed the wettest day in the history of Portland, Oregon, and things were also extremely bad at that time up in the Seattle area.

January: The middle part of the country experienced record-breaking flooding as the calendar rolled over from 2015 to 2016. The only thing that people could really compare it to was the great flood of 1993, and Missouri Governor Jay Nixon said that some communities saw floodwaters get to “places they’ve never been before”. Normally, if the middle of the country is going to see flooding like this it is going to take place when the snow begins to thaw in the spring. For something like this to happen in the middle of the winter was absolutely unprecedented.

January: On January 22nd, one of the worst east coast blizzards in history slammed into Washington D.C., New York City and other major metropolitan areas. More than three feet of snow was dumped on some areas, hundreds of thousands of people were left without power, and coastal cities all long the eastern seaboard experienced flooding that was described as “worse than Hurricane Sandy“. It is also interesting to note that this storm was known as “Jonas”, which is actually a Greek transliteration of the Hebrew name “Jonah”. Jonah, of course, was a Hebrew prophet that was sent to the capital city of Assyria (Ninevah) to warn that the judgment of God was coming. Well, it turns out that this storm called Jonas also hit our capital city (Washington D.C.) on the exact anniversary of Roe v. Wade and in the exact location where Roe v. Wade was decided.

March: Almost two feet of rain triggered historic flooding in parts of Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi. Flooding along one area of the Sabine River broke the previous record by more than five feet, and some sections of Interstate 10 were closed for four days.

April: City officials in Houston declared that the flooding that struck that city was “a life-threatening emergency“, and substantial sections of Interstate 10 and Interstate 45 near downtown were fully underwater. Authorities admitted that water was getting to areas that it had never been before, and Fire Department spokesman Jay Evans said that the water was 10 to 15 feet deep in some areas.

May: Long stretches of Interstate 95 were shut down in South Carolina after Tropical Storm Bonnie dumped massive amounts of rain on the state. At the time, Lance Cpl. Matt Southern of the South Carolina Highway Patrol told reporters that “we are at the mercy of mother nature”.

June: Extremely heavy rain caused the Brazos River in Texas to hit its highest level “in more than a century“, and many parts of Houston found themselves under water yet once again. According to CNN, this was “the second year in a row that Texas has been hit by 500-year floods”…

“It could just be really bad luck,” said CNN Senior Meteorologist Brandon Miller. “A 500-year flood doesn’t mean you will go 500 years between them. It just means it is such an extreme event that the odds of it happening are very low, therefore it only happens on average every 500 years.

“It just so happens that parts of Texas have seen them now in back-to-back years, and maybe even twice this year. The odds of that happening are infinitesimally small.”

Are you starting to see the trend?

There have always been floods, but never before has the United States been hit by so many major floods within such a compressed space of time.

So what is causing all of this?

Why is the U.S. being hit by record wildfires and record flooding simultaneously?

I think that it is interesting to note that our sun has become extremely quiet. Our sun has more influence over our weather than any other natural cause, and right now it is completely spotless

For the second time this month, the sun has gone completely blank. On June 4th, the sun went completely spotless for the first time since 2011 and that quiet spell lasted for about 4 days. Sunspot regions then reappeared for the next few weeks on a sporadic basis, but are once again completely missing from the surface of the sun. The blank sun is a sign that the next solar minimum is approaching and there will be an increasing number of spotless days over the next few years. At first, the blankness will stretch for just a few days at a time, then it’ll continue for weeks at a time, and finally it should last for months at a time when the sunspot cycle reaches its nadir. The next solar minimum phase is expected to take place around 2019 or 2020. The current solar cycle is the 24th since 1755 when extensive recording of solar sunspot activity began and is the weakest in more than a century with the fewest sunspots since cycle 14 peaked in February 1906.

Could that help explain why all of this weird activity is going on, or is there something more taking place?

In my new book, I warn that we are moving into a time that many have described as “a perfect storm”. Our weather is getting crazy, the ground underneath our feet is shaking with frightening regularity, our economic and financial systems are crumbling, and there is political instability all over the planet.

If I am right, natural disasters are going to continue to get even worse and global events are going to continue to spiral out of control.

A great shaking is coming, and yet most people are completely oblivious to what is happening and they are going to be completely blindsided by it.

But those that are wise understand the times, and they will thrive even in the midst of all the chaos and darkness that are coming.

(Originally published on End of the American Dream)

Houston Flooding Is The 8th Historic Flood To Hit America Since The End Of September

Houston Flooding - Public Domain

Why has the United States been hit by historic flood after historic flood in recent months? The flooding that is pummeling the city of Houston is the 8th historic flood in this country since the end of September. City officials down in Houston have labeled the flooding that is currently slamming the city “a life-threatening emergency“, and they are insisting that “Houston residents should avoid travel at all costs today.” At this point, dozens of subdivisions have been flooded and major sections of Interstate 10 and Interstate 45 are under water near downtown. Authorities are telling us that water is getting to areas that it has never been before, and Fire Department spokesman Jay Evans announced that the water is already 10 to 15 feet deep in some areas. But even though some parts of Houston have already gotten close to 20 inches of rain within the last 24 hours, there is more rain in the forecast, so this crisis is far from over.

The giant storm that has caused all of this rain was a complete surprise to many residents of Houston. A lot of people woke up on Monday morning to discover that their neighborhoods now resembled Waterworld. The following comes from the Chicago Tribune

More than a foot of rain fell Monday in parts of Houston, submerging scores of subdivisions and several major interstate highways, forcing the closure of schools and knocking out power to thousands of residents who were urged to shelter in place.

Sylvester Turner, mayor of the nation’s fourth-largest city, told residents to stay home to fend off a weather system he called “stubborn.” More rain was projected over the next two to three days although heavy downpours had subsided somewhat by midday and only another half-inch was expected through Monday night, he said.

If this flooding was just an isolated incident, it wouldn’t really be that big of a deal.

But the truth is that this flooding in Houston continues a very disturbing pattern that began in early October of last year.

Since the end of September, the U.S. has been hit by 8 historic floods, which works out to an average of more than one a month. For this article, I wanted to update a list of these historic floods that I started in a previous article

October: Hurricane Joaquin never makes landfall, but it tracks up the east coast of the United States causing nightmarish rainfall and flooding all over the eastern seaboard. Things were particularly bad in South Carolina, where the governor declared that it was the worst rainfall that many areas of her state had seen in 1,000 years.

October: Violent storms in southern California caused flash flooding that buried some highways in “rivers of mud” that were up to six feet deep. Hundreds of vehicles got buried in the fast moving mud, and the lifeless body of one man that had his vehicle completely encased by several feet of mud was recovered only after a few days had passed because that is how long it took emergency workers to dig him out.

October: Hurricane Patricia was the second most intense tropical cyclone ever recorded in the entire world, and remnants from that storm caused absolutely horrible flooding in some parts of Texas. The flood waters were moving so fast at one point that a freight train was actually knocked entirely off the tracks.

November-December: A “conveyor belt” of violent storms barreled into coastal areas of Oregon and Washington causing nightmarish flooding in many areas. The resulting landslides and floods made headlines all over the country, and it is going to be a long time before the region fully recovers. In early December we witnessed the wettest day in the history of Portland, Oregon, and things were also extremely bad at that time up in the Seattle area.

January: The middle part of the country experienced record-breaking flooding as the calendar rolled over from 2015 to 2016. The only thing that people could really compare it to was the great flood of 1993, and Missouri Governor Jay Nixon said that some communities saw floodwaters get to “places they’ve never been before”. Normally, if the middle of the country is going to see flooding like this it is going to take place when the snow begins to thaw in the spring. For something like this to happen in the middle of the winter was absolutely unprecedented.

January: On January 22nd, one of the worst east coast blizzards in history slammed into Washington D.C., New York City and other major metropolitan areas. More than three feet of snow was dumped on some areas, hundreds of thousands of people were left without power, and coastal cities all long the eastern seaboard experienced flooding that was described as “worse than Hurricane Sandy“. It is also interesting to note that this storm was known as “Jonas”, which is actually a Greek transliteration of the Hebrew name “Jonah”. Jonah, of course, was a Hebrew prophet that was sent to the capital city of Assyria (Ninevah) to warn that the judgment of God was coming. Well, it turns out that this storm called Jonas also hit our capital city (Washington D.C.) on the exact anniversary of Roe v. Wade and in the exact location where Roe v. Wade was decided.

March: Almost two feet of rain triggered historic flooding in parts of Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi. Flooding along one area of the Sabine River broke the previous record by more than five feet, and some sections of Interstate 10 were closed for four days.

Never before has the United States experienced so many historic floods in such a compressed period of time.

So why is this happening?

Some believe that “climate change” is responsible for these bizarre weather patterns, others are pointing the finger at El Nino, and yet others believe that this is a sign that we are approaching “the last days” described in the Bible.

What everybody should be able to agree on is that what we are witnessing is highly, highly unusual.

Historic floods have hit almost every region of the country since the end of September, and the economic damage that has been caused has been immense.

Hopefully we will get a break from all of this flooding soon, but I wouldn’t count on it.

*About the author: Michael Snyder is the founder and publisher of End Of The American Dream. Michael’s controversial new book about Bible prophecy entitled “The Rapture Verdict” is available in paperback and for the Kindle on Amazon.com.*

Flooding Damage From Jonas Will Cost Billions And Is Being Described As ‘Worse Than Hurricane Sandy’

Flooding - Photo by the National Guard

The economic damage done by winter storm Jonas looks like it is going to be much higher than many had originally anticipated.  As you will see below, Moody’s Analytics is projecting that up to 3 billion dollars of damage has been done, and USA Today is reporting that the flooding along the New Jersey and Delaware coasts was “worse than Hurricane Sandy in 2012”.  So all of those that are mocking Jonas as “just a snowstorm” don’t really understand what they are talking about.  Large numbers of homes, businesses and vehicles were destroyed – especially right along the coast.  This was a major disaster, and it is going to take months of work for many of the affected areas to fully recover.

The snow got most of the attention in the media, but the truth is that the flooding along the coast was probably the biggest threat from this storm.  As I noted above, USA Today is reporting that flooding damage caused by Jonas is being “described as worse than Hurricane Sandy in 2012″…

Flooding damage from the weekend storm along the New Jersey and Delaware coasts is already described as worse than Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

“The storm surge and pounding waves caused considerable water damage to homes, businesses, beaches and coastal infrastructure,”  Aon Benfield said in a report it issued Sunday night.

“When combining the actual physical damage to residential and commercial properties, plus automobiles and infrastructure, and adding business interruption losses, we’re potentially looking at one of the costlier winter storm events in recent memory,” Bowen said.

If you don’t live along the coast, it can be easy to sit back and mock.  But the truth is that this was an immensely powerful storm, and it permanently changed the geography right along the edge of the water…

Beach communities in New Jersey and Delaware were evaluating the aftermath from the massive winter storm as high tides washed out dunes and brought icy water into the streets.

Delaware’s sand-enriched beaches from Lewes to Fenwick Island took a whipping as dunes were flattened and wiped away. The ones that remained looked like a giant front-end loader came through and scooped off the face, leaving a jagged series of cliffs.

Sand fencing lay crumpled like the tracks from a derelict roller coaster. And in Rehoboth, the boardwalk buckled in places from the force of waves pounding the boards from the bottom up.

Perhaps those that don’t think that this storm was a “big deal” would like to foot the bill for the damage.

After all, it is only going to be about $3,000,000,000.  The following comes from CNN

The storm that hit the East Coast over the weekend likely cost businesses and residents about $2.5 billion to $3 billion.

That estimate comes from Moody’s Analytics, which estimates most of the cost of the storm is from businesses that lost sales and employees that lost wages when they could not get to work. Those losses were partly offset by people who earned extra wages due to the storm, such as workers who got overtime for plowing roads and parking lots.

And guess what?

As tens of millions of Americans attempt to recover from this storm, another significant winter storm could be rolling in just a few days from now

Our backs hurt from shoveling. Mountains of snow? They’re everywhere. And now we learn ANOTHER storm could roll up the East Coast toward the end of the week. “We could see some snow, a wintry mix or rain in portions of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast,” says Weather Channel meteorologist Quincy Vagell. Oh, the humanity.

Jonas was a truly historic winter storm, and it is very, very unusual to have such severe flooding along the east coast this time of the year.

And of course Jonas represented a continuation of a very strange series of flooding disasters that we have seen in the United States since the end of the Shemitah year.  The following is a list of these disasters that I shared yesterday

-Around the turn of the year the middle part of the country experienced absolutely horrific flooding.  The only thing people can really compare it to is the great flood of 1993, and Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says that some communities saw floodwaters get to “places they’ve never been before”.  Normally if the middle of the country is going to see flooding like this, it is going to happen when the snow begins to thaw in the spring.  For something like this to happen in December is absolutely unprecedented.

-Prior to that, a conveyor belt of storms that barreled into coastal areas of Oregon and Washington caused horrible flooding in many areas.  In fact, in early December we witnessed the wettest day in the history of Portland, Oregon.  The resulting landslides and floods made headlines all over the nation.

-Before that, the remnants of Hurricane Patricia caused nightmarish flooding in many parts of Texas.  The flooding was so bad that at one point an entire train was knocked off the tracks.

-Out on the west coast, flash flooding in southern California sent rivers of mud streaming across highways in southern California.  The lifeless body of one man that had his vehicle completely buried in mud was recovered several days later because that is how long it took emergency workers to get to him.

-To kick things off, moisture from Hurricane Joaquin caused horrible flooding all up and down the east coast back in early October.  The governor of South Carolina said that it was the worst rain that some parts of her state had seen in 1,000 years.

A lot of people out there seem to think that we are just having a really bizarre string of bad luck, while others are not so sure.

But everyone should be able to agree that we have never had six months in all of U.S. history when we have been hit with a series of major flooding events like this.

So why is this happening?

Please feel free to share what you think by posting a comment below…

Why Is This Happening? Unprecedented Flooding Has Hit The U.S. Within The Last 30 Days

South Carolina Flood 2015

Over the past 30 days, major floods have hit the east coast, the west coast and now the middle part of the country. So why is this happening? Why is the U.S. being hit by so many catastrophic weather events all of a sudden? During the past month flooding has caused billions of dollars in damage, and in many areas the clean up is going to take well into next year. Some pundits are blaming El Nino, but others are pointing to other potential reasons for why this may be happening. Let’s start by taking a look at some of the biggest flood events that have happened over the past 30 days…

Hurricane Joaquin never made landfall on the east coast, but moisture from the storm had a tremendous impact – particularly in South Carolina. In fact, the governor of the state said that the region had not seen that type of rain “in a thousand years”

“We haven’t had this level of rain in the low-country in a thousand years — that’s how big this is,” said South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley. Days of record rainfall and catastrophic flooding left at least seventeen people dead in South Carolina and two dead in North Carolina, Oct. 6, 2015. Thirteen dams have failed.

It would be very difficult to overstate the amount of damage that was caused by this storm. Some officials are estimating that the total amount of economic damage done “will probably be in the billions of dollars”

The rains may have stopped in South Carolina, but the danger and the work to rebuild are far from over.

“I believe that things will get worse before they get better,” Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin told reporters Monday.

Eventually the floods will abate, but then we have to access the damage, and I anticipate that damage will probably be in the billions of dollars, and we’re going to have to work to rebuild. Some peoples’ lives as they know them will never be the same,” he said.

Of course this is far from the only destructive flooding event that we have seen in recent weeks.

Out in California they have been getting hit with disaster after disaster. First, the wildfire season came very close to setting a national record this year, and it was particularly bad out west. The following comes from USA Today

The amount of land burned by wildfires in the U.S. this year has surpassed 9 million acres, according to data released Thursday by the National Interagency Fire Center.

This is only the fourth time on record the country has reached the 9 million-acre mark, center spokesman Randall Eardley said in an e-mail. The area burned is roughly equivalent to the size of New Jersey and Connecticut combined.

All of the top years for acres burned have occurred since 2000, Eardley said. The worst year occurred in 2006, with 9.8 million acres. In 2007 and 2012, 9.3 million acres were burned, he said. If another 800,000 acres are burned this year, an all-time record would be set.

I have a feeling that when the final numbers are all in and tallied that 2015 will end up setting an all-time record for wildfires.

But after a really dry, hot summer, southern California got surprised by a deluge of heavy rain this month and the results were absolutely catastrophic. The following comes from Fox News

A flood of mud and debris triggered by heavy rainfall in Southern California rushed onto streets and highways Thursday, stranding hundreds in their cars and closing a major interstate.

Nearly 40 miles of Interstate 5 north in Los Angeles were still closed Friday afternoon after heavy rainfall sent mud, debris and even boulders streaming into the north-south running freeway, according to the California Department of Transportation.

Some people, stuck in up to 5 feet of mud, were forced to camp overnight in their vehicles, according to NBC Los Angeles. Pictures on social media showed some cars submerged in debris up to the windshields.

Authorities are still digging people out from this mess several days later. In fact, the dead body of one man was just pulled out of a van that had been encased in several feet of mud

Southern California fire crews discovered a man’s body Tuesday inside a van that had been buried under several feet of mud after a flash flood overran a road near Los Angeles last week.

And just over this past weekend, the middle part of the country has had to deal with tremendous flooding as well. Hurricane Patricia turned out to be the world’s strongest hurricane since at least 1970, and the remnants of this storm are hitting the state of Texas quite hard.

The small town of Powell, Texas got 20 inches of rain in just 30 hours, and a Union Pacific train that was running nearby was derailed by the heavy flood waters

A Union Pacific freight train carrying cement derailed in Navarro County after a creek overflowed, washing out the tracks. Locomotives and rail cars were pushed on their sides, and a two-person crew was forced to swim to safety.

Repair teams cleared the derailed cars by Sunday morning, but they were not expected to be righted for several hours and a locomotive was not seen being moved until later in the day, Union Pacific spokesman Jeff DeGraff said on Sunday afternoon.

All of this has happened within the past 30 days.

So is there a reason why all of these events have happened?

Of course some people say that it is just a coincidence that all of these storms have hit us in such close proximity.

Others are pointing to the extremely strong El Nino that has developed. Here is an excerpt from a recent Bloomberg report

It has choked Singapore with smoke, triggered Pacific typhoons and left Vietnamese coffee growers staring nervously at dwindling reservoirs. In Africa, cocoa farmers are blaming it for bad harvests, and in the Americas, it has Argentines bracing for lower milk production and Californians believing that rain will finally, mercifully fall.

El Nino is back and in a big way.

Its effects are just beginning in much of the world — for the most part, it hasn’t really reached North America — and yet it’s already shaping up potentially as one of the three strongest El Nino patterns since record-keeping began in 1950. It will dominate weather’s many twists and turns through the end of this year and well into next. And it’s causing gyrations in everything from the price of Colombian coffee to the fate of cold-water fish.

That certainly doesn’t sound promising for the months ahead.

But some climate “experts” are really playing down the impact of El Nino. Instead, they are attempting to convince us that what we are witnessing is simply the result of “man-made climate change”, and they are using this as an opportunity to promote their agenda.

And there are yet others that see a spiritual dimension to all of this. In fact, there are some out there that believe that all of this flooding could be a sign that the judgment of God on America has begun.

So what do you think?

Do you believe that there is a reason why the U.S. is experiencing so much flooding lately?

Please feel free to share what you think by posting a comment below…

(Originally published on The Economic Collapse Blog)

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