The Reason College Costs More Than You Think

College Graduation - Photo by Mando vzl

Nearly nine out of 10 freshmen think they’ll earn their bachelor’s degrees within the traditional four years, according to a nationwide survey conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA. But the U.S. Department of Education reports that fewer than half that many actually will. And about 45 percent won’t have finished even after six years.

That means the annual cost of college, a source of so much anxiety for families and students, often overlooks the enormous additional expense of the extra time it will actually take to graduate.

“It’s a huge inconvenience,” says Nichols, whose college career has been prolonged for the common reason that he changed majors and took courses he ended up not needing. His athletic scholarship — Nichols was a middle-distance runner on the cross-country team — ran out after four years. “I had to get some financial help from my parents.”

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U.S. Colleges See Gay Students As Growth Market

Gay Students - Public Domain

Growing up as a fundamentalist Christian in Austin, Texas, Josh Bergeleen says he “didn’t know that gay was a thing.”

That changed when he went off to college at Emory University in Atlanta, and he came out at 18, shortly after beginning his freshman year. Four years later, Bergeleen credits Emory’s welcoming environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students as a key factor not only in his discovering his own identity, but in helping him stay on track to graduate from the business school this year.

“I wouldn’t have been able to continue if not for their support,” Bergeleen says. At one particularly rough point after coming out, Bergeleen stopped talking to his own family and says Emory’s LGBT student support office “made me feel comfortable with myself.”

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Student debt becoming a larger albatross for economic growth: $1.2 trillion in student debt is outstanding and many college graduates working in jobs that don’t require their degree

Student Loan Debt College University

There was a time when going to college made sense in every feasible way. It made sense professionally, economically, and many college graduates have a wonderful time in the process of completing their degrees. Most would argue that learning is vital in growing and moving forward. Yet students need to ask whether their return on investment is really worth it? Many people go to college in a compulsory fashion. This is simply the next step after high school. This was an easy decision to make during a time when the costs of going to college were affordable. Today, many schools charge $40,000 and $50,000 per year for a basic undergraduate degree. That is problematic. A large number of recent graduates are now working in positions that don’t require their specific field of study. In other words, they are employed in a field different from their undergraduate degree but still carry forward with mounds of debt. The total student debt market is now well over $1.2 trillion. It might be worth it to take a course in Student Debt 101.

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Why Are Wages for Young College Grads So Terrible?

Graduation

When young people do things that confound the rest of the country—like take forever to find their own place, delay marriage, stop having kids, stuff like that—some analysts turn to young-adult psychology or brain-destroying technology for an explanation.

There’s a better (albeit less sexy) story. More young people are grabbing debt to go to college, but they can’t punch the ticket to full-fledged adulthood, because college-grad wages are growing at historically pitiful levels. In fact, the incomes of recent college grads are growing so glacially that they make the rest of the country look like we’re discovering $100 bills in our coat jackets every morning.

College-grad wages hit a wall. Why?

Perhaps the most obvious—and most commonly offered—explanation is that the recession has forced the entire youth generation to become a collective of baristas, fast-food workers, part-time artists, and otherwise “under-employed” people. (Under-employed typically means working at a job that requires less than your education.)

This explanation isn’t merely incomplete. It’s almost certainly wrong. The share of recent college grads who are under-employed is higher than normal, but it’s not that much higher than the long-term average.

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University offers female students extra credit for not shaving their armpits

Pink Razor - Public Domain

Female Arizona State University students can receive extra credit for defying social norms and refusing to shave for 10 weeks during the semester.

Women and Gender Studies Professor Breanne Fahs, encourages her female students to cease shaving their underarms and legs during the semester and document their experiences in a journal.

Student Stephanie Robinson said it was a “life changing experience.”

“Many of my friends didn’t want to work out next to me or hear about the assignment, and my mother was distraught at the idea that I would be getting married in a white dress with armpit hair,” Robinson told ASU news.

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College Application From 1922 Shows How Much America Has Changed In 100 Years

College Application From 1922

What do you think would happen if any college in America asked some of these questions today?  Needless to say, it would make front page news all over the nation.  As you read over this college application, take note of how dramatically this country has changed over the past 100 years.

So have we changed for the better or for the worse?

Please feel free to share your thoughts by posting a comment below…

Think college is expensive now? Wait until July 1

College Education

More than 70 percent of graduates will carry student debt into the real world, according to the Institute for College Access and Success. And the average debt is just shy of $30,000.

But the news will get worse next week when interest rates on student loans are set to rise again.

Though federal student loan rates are fixed for the life of the loan, these rates reset for new borrowers every July 1, thanks to legislation that ties the rates to the performance of the financial markets.

The interest rate on federal Stafford loans will go from its current fixed rate of just under 4 percent to 4.66 percent for loans that are distributed between July 1 and June 30, 2015.

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Universities All Over The U.S. Allow Special Honor Cords To Gay Graduates For Being Gay

 

College Graduates By Kit from Pittsburgh, USA

College graduation is a special time in America, and it’s even more special this year if you are gay.

A number of public colleges and universities gave special recognition this year to graduating seniors who amazingly managed to complete their degrees while suffering the grueling hardship of being lesbians and homosexuals, reports Campus Reform.

Administrators at these taxpayer-funded institutions allowed gay students to attend this year’s commencement ceremonies donning caps and gowns with special honor cords.

Straight students do not appear to have been given the option of having special tassels.

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