NIH Announces Natural Treatment for Ebola

Ebola Symptoms - CDC

Ebola is a very nasty disease. At the beginning, you have fever, then vomiting and diarrhea, a rash, and then it starts to deteriorate your organs.  If you’re lucky, you’ll live. At least 70% of Africans who contract Ebola aren’t that lucky. All this occurs inside of 2 weeks, most likely less.

And when have you last heard of a government health agency advocating a natural substance to treat a disease, never mind one of such horrific magnitude as Ebola? But, they have, perhaps out of a lack of any other options.

In a recent article by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) they advocate treating Ebola with this relatively common nutritional supplement you may have already even taken before, available widely at all health food stores…

ebola virus

“At the end stage of the disease, you have small leaks in blood vessels,” says Thomas Geisbert, an immunologist at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. “You end up with essentially no blood pressure. Your body temperature drops and you go into shock.”

Beneath it all , a surprising fact surfaces: The virus isn’t what ends up killing you. It’s your own immune system.

“The normal job of the immune system is to eliminate infections,” says virologist Christopher Basler, at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “But when it’s activated at extreme levels or it’s out of control, it becomes damaging to the host.”

The most extreme immune attack is the “cytokine storm.” Although many viruses, like bird flu and SARS, can trigger this shock and awe assault, Ebola is probably the best at it. And at the end of an Ebola infection, it’s the cytokine storm that kills you, Basler says.

Cytokines can make immune cells rush to the site of infection, gobble up sick cells and even sneak through blood vessel walls. Cytokines can also activate inflammation, which causes damaged tissue to swell, heat up and hurt.

In essence, a cytokine storm is an SOS signal that causes the immune system to launch its entire arsenal of weapons all atonce. This last-ditch, kamikaze attack hurts the virus. But it leaves behind tons of collateral damage. Blood vessels take the brunt of it.

“The cytokine storm makes the blood vessel walls more permeable,” Basler says. So the arteries, veins and capillaries start to leak blood and plasma. The storm also triggers a big release of nitric oxide, which thins out the blood and damages vessels further.

All these factors combine together to reduce blood pressure to dangerous levels, Geisbert says. “So you don’t die of blood loss, but from something similar to severe septic shock.”

An October 2014 article in the National Institute of Health says,


“The purpose of this report is to emphasize the potential utility for the use of melatonin in the treatment of individuals 
who are infected with the Ebola virus.

The pathological changes associated with an Ebola infection include, most notably, endothelial disruption, disseminated intravascular coagulation and multiple organ hemorrhage.

Melatonin has been shown to target these alterations. Numerous similarities between Ebola virus infection and septic shock have been recognized for more than a decade. Moreover, melatonin has been successfully employed for the treatment of sepsis in many experimental and clinical studies.

Based on these factors, as the number of treatments currently available is limited and the useable products are not abundant, the use of melatonin for the treatment of Ebola virus infection is encouraged. Additionally, melatonin has a high safety profile, is readily available and can be orally self-administered; thus, the use of melatonin is compatible with the large scale of this serious outbreak.

Another article in the National Institute of Health says,

“Melatonin plays an important physiologic role in sleep and circadian rhythm regulation, immunoregulation, antioxidant and mitochondrial-protective functions, reproductive control, and regulation of mood. 

Melatonin has also been reported as effective in combating various bacterial and viral infections. Melatonin is an effective anti-inflammatory agent in various animal models of inflammation and sepsis, …. In a number of animal models of septic shock, as well as in patients with septic disease, melatonin reportedly exerts beneficial effects to arrest cellular damage and multiorgan failure. The significance of these actions in septic shock and its potential usefulness in the treatment of multiorgan failure are discussed.
Article authored by Carol Serpa. You can find the original story right here.

Ebola Cases Rise Sharply In Western Sierra Leone

Ebola Death - Public Domain

After emerging months ago in eastern Sierra Leone, Ebola is now hitting the western edges of the country where the capital is located with dozens of people falling sick each day, the government said Tuesday. So many people are dying that removing bodies is reportedly a problem.

Forty-nine confirmed cases of Ebola emerged in just one day, Monday, in two Ebola zones in and around the capital, the National Ebola Response Center, or NERC, said. Lawmaker Claude Kamanda who represents a western area said more than 20 deaths are being reported daily.

Kamanda told the local Politico newspaper that authorities are experiencing challenges collecting corpses from both quarantined and non-quarantined homes.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

Ebola: Liberia deaths ‘far higher than reported’ as officials downplay epidemic

Ebola In West Africa - Photo by European Commission

The true death toll from the Ebola epidemic is being masked by chaotic data collection and people’s reluctance to admit that their loved ones had the virus, according to one of west Africa’s most celebrated film-makers.

Sorious Samura, who has just returned from making a documentary on the crisis in Liberia, said it is very clear on the ground that the true number of dead is far higher than the official figures being reported by the World Health Organisation.

Liberia accounts for more than half of all the official Ebola deaths, with a total of 2,458. Overall, the number of dead across Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea has exceeded 4,500.

Samura, a television journalist originally from Sierra Leone, said the Liberian authorities appeared to be deliberately downplaying the true number of cases, for fear of increasing alarm in the west African country.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

Ebola Cases Could Zoom to 10,000 a Week, WHO Warns

Ebola Virus - CDC

The Ebola epidemic could get dramatically worse with the rate of infection soaring to 10,000 new cases every week unless drastic measures are not taken within the next two months, the World Health Organization said today.

That staggering figure is approximately 10 times higher than the current rate of infection, but WHO Assistant Director General Dr. Bruce Aylward said that it could easily get that dramatic if steps are not taken now.

“A lot more people will die,” Aylward said if more on-the-ground prevention measures are not put in place in the next 60 days.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

82 percent of Ebola patients are being turned away from hospitals to die at home, spreading infections to family members

Ebola Death - Public Domain

A lack of available hospital beds in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, the three countries at the epicenter of the worst Ebola outbreak in history, is leaving many families with nowhere to take their sick and dying. More than 80 percent of Ebola patients, in fact, are being turned away from hospitals and sent back home, where they continue to spread the disease to family members, friends and others in the community.

A major shortage of beds and healthcare workers throughout the region has created an every-man-for-himself situation in which infected folks are having to basically fend for themselves. This is a worst-case scenario for containing the disease, as most of its spread is believed to occur when Ebola patients return home and try to hide their disease from everyone else, quietly spreading it in the process.

The New York Times (NYT) says that only 18 percent of Ebola patients are receiving proper care in isolation from the general public. This leaves the other 82 percent to meander about, haphazardly infecting others who then infect more others, and on and on it goes with no end in sight. By January 20, say experts, as many as 1.4 million people could become infected with Ebola in West Africa due to this epidemic of non-containment.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

Ebola conspiracy theories abound: GMO bioweapon? DoD experiment gone wrong? Five incredible theories explored

Ebola - Public Domain

History has proven that conspiracy theory often turns out to be conspiracy fact. A “conspiracy” is merely when two or more people secretly plot to carry out some nefarious act, and the U.S. Dept. of Justice has proven that U.S. drug companies, for example, routinely engage in conspiracies against the public.

Always remember that anyone who uses the term “conspiracy theory” in a derogatory context is actually admitting to their own ignorance of history. No chapter of U.S. or world history took place without involving some sort of conspiracy theory-turned-fact. Conspiracies are so real, in fact, that the U.S. government’s official story of what happened on 9/11 describes a classic conspiracy among Saudi operatives.

Turning to Ebola, here are the more popular — and possibly credible — conspiracy theories circulating right now. Ask yourself: Are any of these conspiracies possibly true?

(Read the rest of the story here…)

Computer Models Tell Us That This Ebola Pandemic Could Soon Kill Millions

Ebola Is Coming - Public Domain

We could potentially be on the verge of the greatest health crisis that any of us have ever seen. The number of Ebola cases in Africa has approximately doubled over the past three weeks, and scientific computer models tell us that this Ebola pandemic could ultimately end up killing millions of us – especially if it starts spreading on other continents. At first, many assumed that this Ebola outbreak would be just like all the others – that it would flare up for a little while and then it would completely fade away. But that has not happened this time. Instead, this epidemic has seemed to pick up momentum with each passing week. Despite extraordinary precautions, hundreds of health workers have gotten the virus, and the head of the CDC says that the spread of Ebola is “spiraling out of control” and that it is “going to get worse in the very near future.” For those that have thought that all of this talk about Ebola was just “fearmongering”, it is time for you to wake up.

Right now, the World Health Organization says that we could see the total number of Ebola cases reach 20,000 nine months from now. But computer models created for the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense are projecting that Ebola could soon be growing at a rate of 20,000 cases per month

The Ebola epidemic affecting West Africa is predicted to last a further 12 to 18 months, according to U.S. scientists.

Epidemiologists have been creating computer models of the Ebola epidemic for the National Institutes of Health and the Defense Department.

The model they have created is a far less optimistic estimate than that of the World Health Organization (WHO), which last month said it hoped to contain the outbreak within nine months and 20,000 total cases.

The New York Times reports that various researchers have said the virus could grow at a rate that could be closer to 20,000 per month.

The WHO is sticking to its estimates, a spokesman said Friday.

Other scientists are even more pessimistic.

For example, a model created jointly by a researcher at the University of Tokyo and a researcher at Arizona State University has produced a “worst-case scenario” of 277,124 Ebola cases by the end of this year

The Eurosurveillance paper, by two researchers from the University of Tokyo and Arizona State University, attempts to derive what the reproductive rate has been in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. (Note for actual epidemiology geeks: The calculation is for the effective reproductive number, pegged to a point in time, hence actually Rt.) They come up with an R of at least 1, and in some cases 2; that is, at certain points, sick persons have caused disease in two others.

You can see how that could quickly get out of hand, and in fact, that is what the researchers predict. Here is their stop-you-in-your-tracks assessment:

In a worst-case hypothetical scenario, should the outbreak continue with recent trends, the case burden could gain an additional 77,181 to 277,124 cases by the end of 2014.

That is a jaw-dropping number.

If we do see an explosion like that, how many millions of cases will we see by the time 2015 is through?

A different model has produced an even more jaw-dropping number.

An “econometric simulation model” created by Francis Smart at Michigan State University is predicting that a whopping 1.2 million people will die from Ebola in the next six months

An econometric simulation model based on the assumption the World Health Organization and others will be unable to control the Ebola outbreak in West Africa predicts 1.2 million people will die from the disease in the next six months.

Six months is the minimum time the WHO projects will be necessary to contain the epidemic.

In his analysis, econometrics research assistant Francis Smart at Michigan State University took seriously the conclusions of Canadian researchers who proved the strain of Ebola in the current West African epidemic could go airborne.

The Ebola virus could be transmitted between humans through breathing, Smart says.

In developing the model, Smart began with WHO’s Aug. 28 statement that the Ebola epidemic in West Africa could afflict more than 20,000 people before it is brought under control.

That has got to be the worst possible number, right?

Wrong.

The other day a prominent German virologist came forward and declared that “it is too late” to stop Ebola and that five million people will die in Sierra Leone and Liberia alone…

A top German virologist has caused shockwaves by asserting that it’s too late to halt the spread of Ebola in Sierra Leone and Liberia and that five million people will die, noting that efforts should now be focused on stopping the transmission of the virus to other countries.

Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit of the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in Hamburg told Germany’s Deutsche Welle that hope is all but lost for the inhabitants of Sierra Leone and Liberia and that the virus will only “burn itself out” when it has infected the entire population and killed five million people.

“The right time to get this epidemic under control in these countries has been missed,” said Schmidt-Chanasit. “That time was May and June. “Now it is too late.”

So which of the numbers discussed above are accurate?

Only time will tell.

Meanwhile, the U.S. federal government is feverishly preparing for the worst.

This week we learned that Barack Obama is going to ask Congress for 88 million dollars for the purpose of conducting “a major Ebola offensive” in Africa.

Granted, Obama will ask Congress for money at the drop of a hat these days. He wants 500 million dollars to arm the allies of ISIS and his reckless spending has been one of the primary factors why the U.S. national debt has risen by more than a trillion dollars over the past 12 months.

But it is still noteworthy.

Even more noteworthy is the fact that the U.S. State Department has just ordered 160,000 Hazmat suits

The U.S. State Department has ordered 160,000 Hazmat suits for Ebola, prompting concerns that the federal government is anticipating the rapid spread of a virus that has already claimed an unprecedented number of lives.

In a press release posted by Market Watch, Lakeland Industries, a manufacturer of industrial protective clothing for first responders, announced that it had signaled its intention “to join the fight against the spread of Ebola” by encouraging other suppliers to meet the huge demand created by the U.S. State Department’s order of 160,000 hazmat suits.

“With the U.S. State Department alone putting out a bid for 160,000 suits, we encourage all protective apparel companies to increase their manufacturing capacity for sealed seam garments so that our industry can do its part in addressing this threat to global health,” states the press release.

The huge bulk order of hazmat suits for Ebola has stoked concerns that the U.S. government expects the virus to continue to ravage countries in west Africa and may also be concerned about an outbreak inside the United States.

You don’t order that many Hazmat suits unless you are anticipating an outbreak of apocalyptic proportions.

And the CDC has just issued a six page Ebola checklist to hospitals to help them spot potential Ebola patients in America…

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, warning hospitals and doctors that “now is the time to prepare,” has issued a six-page Ebola “checklist” to help healthcare workers quickly determine if patients are infected.

While the CDC does not believe that there are new cases of Ebola in the United States, the assumption in the checklist is that it is only a matter of time before the virus hits home.

Let us hope and pray that these precautions do not become necessary.

Because if Ebola starts spreading like wildfire in this country, we are going to see pain and suffering beyond anything that most of us have ever imagined.

Just consider what a health worker on the front lines is seeing on a day to day basis…

I wake up each morning – if I have managed to sleep – wondering if this is really happening, or if it is a horror movie. In decades of humanitarian work I have never witnessed such relentless suffering of fellow human beings or felt so completely paralysed and utterly overwhelmed at our inability to provide anything but the most basic, and sometimes less than adequate, care.

I am supervising the suspect tent, which has room for 25 patients who are likely to have Ebola – 80-90% of those we test have the virus. We administer treatment for malaria, start patients on antibiotics, paracetamol, multivitamins, rehydration supplements, food, water and juice while they wait for their results. Sometimes people have arrived too late and die shortly after arriving.

In one afternoon last week I watched five seemingly fit, healthy, young men die. I gave the first a bottle of oral rehydration solution and came back with another for the second. In the half a minute or so in which I had been away the first man died, his bottle of water spilt across the floor. The four others followed in quick succession.

Ebola is truly a terrible, terrible disease.

The moment that cases start popping up in the United States, all of our lives will instantly change.

I hope that you are getting prepared for that.

(Originally posted on The Economic Collapse Blog)

Virologist: ‘It’s Too Late, Ebola Will Kill 5 Million’

Ebola Scare

A top German virologist has caused shockwaves by asserting that it’s too late to halt the spread of Ebola in Sierra Leone and Liberia and that five million people will die, noting that efforts should now be focused on stopping the transmission of the virus to other countries.

Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit of the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in Hamburg told Germany’s Deutsche Welle that hope is all but lost for the inhabitants of Sierra Leone and Liberia and that the virus will only “burn itself out” when it has infected the entire population and killed five million people.

“The right time to get this epidemic under control in these countries has been missed,” said Schmidt-Chanasit. “That time was May and June. “Now it is too late.”

The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed over 2200 people, with Liberia and Sierra Leone accounting for over 1700 of those fatalities.

While calling for “massive help” from the international community to prevent Ebola appearing in other countries like Nigeria and Senegal, Schmidt-Chanasit warns that getting a grip on the epidemic in Liberia and Sierra Leone is a departure from reality.

German aid organization Welthungerhilfe blasted Schmidt-Chanasit for his comments, with Sierra Leone based coordinator Jochen Moninger labeling his statements, “dangerous and moreover, not correct.” However, Moninger acknowledged that Schmidt-Chanasit’s assessment may be accurate in the case of Liberia.

The World Health Organization refused to comment on Schmidt-Chanasit’s remarks.

Although Ebola continues to rage in five African countries, media coverage of the epidemic has waned, despite evidence that the virus has mutated.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

Scientific Model: 1.2 Million Will Be Dead From Ebola In 6 Months

Ebola Death - Public Domain

An econometric simulation model based on the assumption the World Health Organization and others will be unable to control the Ebola outbreak in West Africa predicts 1.2 million people will die from the disease in the next six months.

Six months is the minimum time the WHO projects will be necessary to contain the epidemic.

In his analysis, econometrics research assistant Francis Smart at Michigan State University took seriously the conclusions of Canadian researchers who proved the strain of Ebola in the current West African epidemic could go airborne.

The Ebola virus could be transmitted between humans through breathing, Smart says.

In developing the model, Smart began with WHO’s Aug. 28 statement that the Ebola epidemic in West Africa could afflict more than 20,000 people before it is brought under control.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

The Ebola Virus Is Spreading ‘Like Wildfire’ In Liberia

Ebola - CDC

With warnings from officials that the Ebola virus is “spreading like wildfire” in Liberia, Sarah Crowe, who works for the UN children’s agency (Unicef), describes her week on the Ebola front line:

Flights into disaster zones are usually full of aid workers and journalists. Not this time.

The plane was one of the first in after some 10 airlines stopped flying to Liberia because of Ebola, and still it was empty.

When I was last in Liberia in 2006, it was to work on reintegration of child soldiers in a time of peace. Now the country is fighting a “biological war” from an unseen enemy without foot soldiers.

As we enter the airport, an unnerving sight – a team of health workers kitted out with masks and gloves asks us to wash our hands with a chlorine solution and takes our temperatures.

(Read the rest of the story here…)

No More Places To Put Ebola Patients In Liberia But Cases Are Growing Exponentially

Ebola Cases And Ebola Deaths - Photo by Leopoldo Martin R

There is not a single empty bed available for an Ebola patient in Liberia right now, but thousands more cases are expected in the coming weeks. Entire families have been driving around in taxis looking for some place that will take their sick family members, but every treatment facility is already full. According to the World Health Organization, many of those potential Ebola patients end up returning to their homes where there will inevitably spread the virus to even more people. What we are watching unfold is literally a nightmare scenario. According to the WHO, 4,293 cases of Ebola have now been recorded and 2,296 people have died from the disease. But what makes those numbers so alarming is that the spread of the virus appears to be accelerating. 47 percent of the deaths and 49 percent of the cases have come in the last 21 days. If Ebola continues to spread at an exponential pace like this, we could be looking at the greatest public health crisis in any of our lifetimes.

Health officials are feverishly trying to open new treatment facilities in Liberia, but they can’t seem to keep up with the number of new cases. The moment a new facility opens, it is immediately filled

“As soon as a new Ebola treatment facility is opened, it immediately fills to overflowing with patients, pointing to a large but previously invisible caseload,” the agency said in a statement about the situation in Liberia. “Many thousands of new cases are expected in Liberia over the coming three weeks.”

And as I mentioned above, some potential Ebola victims haven’t been able to find anywhere to go. The following comes from a recent NBC News report

In Monrovia, taxis filled with entire families, of whom some members are thought to be infected with the Ebola virus, crisscross the city, searching for a treatment bed. There are none. As WHO staff in Liberia confirm, no free beds for Ebola treatment exist anywhere in the country.

And because Ebola victims have been using taxis to travel around in search of treatment, that has made those taxis “a hot source of potential Ebola virus transmission”…

“According to a WHO staff member who has been in Liberia for the past several weeks, motorbike-taxis and regular taxis are a hot source of potential Ebola virus transmission, as these vehicles are not disinfected at all, much less before new passengers are taken on board,” WHO said.

“When patients are turned away at Ebola treatment centers, they have no choice but to return to their communities and homes, where they inevitably infect others, perpetuating constantly higher flare-ups in the number of cases.”

At this point there is no hope that Ebola will be defeated in Liberia any time soon. In fact, the WHO says that it is anticipating “thousands of new cases” in Liberia in the coming weeks.

Things have gotten so bad that a door-to-door campaign has been organized to try to track down those who have the virus. Between September 19th and September 21st, volunteers will visit every single home in Liberia

Volunteers in Sierra Leone are to visit every home in the country of 6 million to track down people with Ebola and remove dead bodies.

Steven Ngaoja, the head of the country’s Ebola Emergency Operations Centre, said more than 20,000 volunteers would go door-to-door as part of a three-day curfew.

He said every house in the country would be visited from September 19 to 21.

Hopefully all of those volunteers will be given proper protective equipment. Otherwise, such an endeavor could end up just accelerating the spread of the virus even more.

And the truth is that there are probably far more people sick in Liberia than we are being told.

In fact, even the WHO admits that the official numbers greatly underestimate the scope of this crisis…

As well as struggling to contain the disease, the organization is having difficulty compiling data on the number of cases, said Sylvie Briand, the director of WHO’s department of pandemic and epidemic diseases.

We know that the numbers are under-estimated. We are currently working to estimate the under-estimation,” Briand told a news briefing in Geneva.

“It’s a war against this virus. It’s a very difficult war. What we try now is to win some battles at least in some places.”

One doctor says that the real numbers could be “double or triple” what we are being told.

But nobody really knows.

And as the numbers continue to grow, there won’t be places to treat all of the new victims.

According to one report, there are only approximately 570 beds in Ebola treatment facilities in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia combined.

Needless to say, that is not going to do the job, and it is now being reported that Ebola is surging back in places where it was thought that it had been beaten.

Right now we are losing the battle to contain this virus, and this might just be the beginning of this plague.

The other day my friend Mac Slavo shared a video that was produced by MIT and the New England Complex Systems Institute. This video uses a computer simulation to show what the spread of Ebola could look like if it goes worldwide…

Like I said, we could potentially be facing the greatest health crisis that any of us have ever seen.

So let us hope and pray that this virus does not get out of Africa.

But all it takes is a single carrier.

For example, it is being reported that a Nigerian woman is now being tested for the Ebola virus in Italy

A Nigerian woman resident in Italy has been hospitalised with symptoms that have led doctors to fear she may be the country’s first case of someone contracting the Ebola virus.

The woman, who had recently returned from a visit to Nigeria, has been hospitalised in Ancona and was undergoing tests in a specialist unit to establish whether she has contracted the virus which has killed more than 2,000 people since the start of the year.

“She is presenting with symptoms that could be those of Ebola,” a spokesman for the local authorities in the Le Marche region said.

And if it gets to the United States, it could be worse than any Hollywood movie ever imagined that it could be.

If you believe that the federal government is going to come swooping in to save you if Ebola does come here, you might want to think again. Just consider the following excerpt from a recent CNN article

A federal investigation has found that the DHS is totally “ill-prepared” for something like the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic — or something worse, such as a global Ebola outbreak or the 1918 flu pandemic that killed an estimated 21.5 million people, according to a report released by the Office of the Inspector General on Monday.

In 2006, Congress gave DHS $47 million to prepare for such a national medical crisis. And the department did go shopping; it spent millions on this equipment that might now be completely worthless, missing or unnecessary.

For example, the audit found more than 4,000 bottles of expired hand sanitizer in storage with the DHS. Many of those bottles have been expired for up to four years.

The truth is that we are not prepared for something like this.

If an outbreak erupts in major U.S. cities, there is the potential that it could start spreading like wildfire.

So let us hope and pray for the best, but let us also get prepared for the worst.

(Originally posted at End of the American Dream)

16 Apocalyptic Quotes From Global Health Officials About This Horrific Ebola Epidemic

Gustave Doré - Death on the Pale Horse

Ebola continues to spread an an exponential rate. According to the World Health Organization, 40 percent of all Ebola cases have happened in just the last three weeks. At this point, the official numbers tell us that approximately 3,500 people have gotten the virus in Africa and more than 1,900 people have died. That is quite alarming, but the real problem will arise if this disease continues to spread at an exponential pace. One team of researchers has used computer modeling to project that the number of Ebola cases will reach 10,000 by September 24th if current trends continue. And if the spread of Ebola does not slow down, we could be dealing with 100,000 cases by December. Even the WHO is admitting that the number of cases is likely to grow to 20,000 before too much longer, and global health officials are now starting to use apocalyptic language to describe this outbreak.

For people in the western world that have never seen anything like this other than in the movies, it can be difficult to grasp just how horrible this epidemic truly is. In the areas of west Africa where Ebola is spreading, fear and panic are everywhere, food shortages are becoming a serious problem and there have been reports of dead bodies rotting in the streets. People are avoiding hospitals and clinics because of paranoia about the fact that so many health workers have contracted the disease. According to the World Health Organization, more than 240 health workers have gotten the virus so far and more than 120 of them have perished.

We have never seen anything like this in any of our lifetimes, and the scary part is that this might only be just the beginning.

The following are 16 apocalyptic quotes from global health officials about this horrific Ebola epidemic…

#1 Dr. Tom Frieden, the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: “It is the world’s first Ebola epidemic, and it’s spiraling out of control. It’s bad now, and it’s going to get worse in the very near future. There is still a window of opportunity to tamp it down, but that window is closing. We really have to act now.”

#2 Dr. Joanne Liu, the international president of Doctors Without Borders: “Riots are breaking out. Isolation centres are overwhelmed. Health workers on the frontline are becoming infected and are dying in shocking numbers.”

#3 David Nabarro, senior United Nations system coordinator for Ebola disease: “This outbreak is moving ahead of efforts to control it.”

#4 Dr. Bruce Aylward, WHO’s assistant director-general for emergency operations: “This far outstrips any historic Ebola outbreak in numbers. The largest outbreak in the past was about 400 cases.”

#5 Margaret Chan, the head of the World Health Organization: “…we hope to stop the transmission in six to nine months”.

#6 Dr. Daniel Bausch, associate professor in the department of Tropical Medicine at Tulane University: “You have a very dangerous virus in three of the countries in the world that are least equipped to deal with it. The scale of this outbreak has just outstripped the resources. That’s why it’s become so big.”

#7 Gayle Smith, senior director at the National Security Council: “This is not an African disease. This is a virus that is a threat to all humanity.”

#8 Dr. Tom Frieden, the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: “The level of outbreak is beyond anything we’ve seen—or even imagined.”

#9 Vincent Martin, head of an FAO unit in Dakar: “This is different than every other Ebola situation we’ve ever had. It’s spreading widely, throughout entire countries, through multiple countries, in cities and very fast.”

#10 Dr. Richard Besser, health and medical editor for ABC News: “Emergency rooms are closed, many hospital wards are as well leaving people who are sick with heart disease, trauma, pregnancy complications, pneumonia, malaria and all the everyday health emergencies with nowhere to go.”

#11 Bukar Tijani, the UN Food and Agricultural Organization regional representative for Africa: “Access to food has become a pressing concern for many people in the three affected countries and their neighbours.”

#12 Keiji Fukuda, the WHO’s assistant director-general for health security: “People are hungry in these communities. They don’t know how they are going to get food.”

#13 Dr. Daniel Bausch, associate professor in the department of Tropical Medicine at Tulane University: “This is for sure the worst situation I’ve ever seen.”

#14 Dr. Tom Frieden, the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: “I could not possibly overstate the need for an urgent response.”

#15 Official WHO statement: “Staff at the outbreak sites see evidence that the numbers of reported cases and deaths vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak.”

#16 Dr. Joanne Liu, the international president of Doctors Without Borders: “It is impossible to keep up with the sheer number of infected people pouring into facilities. In Sierra Leone, infectious bodies are rotting in the streets.”

Despite all of these warnings, a lot of people in the western world are not too concerned about this epidemic because they have faith that our advanced technology will prevent a widespread Ebola outbreak in the United States and Europe.

But I wouldn’t be so certain about that.

So far, the most promising experimental Ebola drug seems to be ZMapp. In clinical trials, it has been doing very well on monkeys.

However, it hasn’t turned out to be a silver bullet for humans so far. Two out of the seven people that have received ZMapp have died, and as CBS News recently explained, current supplies are exhausted and it takes a really long time to make more of this stuff…

ZMapp’s maker, Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., of San Diego, has said the small supply of the drug is now exhausted and that it will take several months to make more. The drug is grown in tobacco plants and was developed with U.S. government support.

Kobinger said it takes about a month to make 20 to 40 doses at a Kentucky plant where the drug is being produced. Officials have said they are looking at other facilities and other ways to ramp up production, and Kobinger said there were plans for a clinical trial to test ZMapp in people early next year.

The cold, hard truth is that Ebola is a brutally efficient killer for which we do not have a cure at the moment.

And what makes things even more complicated is that a different strain of Ebola is now spreading in the Democratic Republic of Congo. A treatment that works for one strain of Ebola may not work on another strain.

So let us hope and pray that Ebola does not reach the United States.

If it does, it could potentially spread like wildfire.

(Originally posted at The Economic Collapse Blog)

Soldiers spill blood in Liberian Ebola slum as riot breaks out over the quarantine of 50,000 residents

Liberia - Photo by Martin23230

Liberian soldiers opened fire on residents of a slum in their country’s capital city today after it was locked down in an effort to contain the spread of Ebola virus.

People ran screaming as soldiers from the country’s Ebola Task Force brutally enforced a quarantine of Monrovia’s West Point district ordered by the country’s president last night.

As the violence erupted in Liberia, hundreds of miles away a team of experts was meanwhile dispatched to a remote part of of Congo where 10 people died after suffering Ebola like symptoms.

It was not immediately clear if the victims had died of Ebola, but a witness said they had all suffered fever, diarrhoea and bleeding from the ears and nostrils – all symptoms of the deadly virus.

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Mystery Illness With ‘Ebola-Like Symptoms’ Kills 10 In Congo

Ebola Epidemic - Public Domain

Around 10 people have died after developing Ebola-like symptoms in the Democratic Republic of Congo, officials have said.

Experts have now been sent to a remote area on the northern Equateur province to establish what is causing the deaths.

According to Reuters, the DRC has sent its health minister to the area. It is not clear if the disease is related to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, where over 1,200 people have died from the virus in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria.

One local said around 10 people have died, including four health care workers. Their symptoms included fever, diarrhoea and bleeding from the ears and nostrils.

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CDC director: ‘We can stop’ Ebola from spreading

Ebola Epidemic - Public Domain

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said in an interview on CBS’ “Face the Nation” that he is confident that the Ebola outbreak in West Africa can be stopped and likely won’t reach the U.S.

“The plain fact is, we can stop it. We can stop it from spreading in hospitals and we can stop it in Africa [which] is really the source of the epidemic and where we’re surging our response so that we can control it there,” Tom Frieden said in an interview Sunday. He noted that the U.S. has helped stop every previous outbreak of the deadly virus, even though it’s not easy.

Frieden said he was encouraged by the apparent improvement of Kent Brantly, an American doctor from Texas who contracted the disease in Liberia but arrived back in the U.S. on Saturday for treatment.

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World Health Organization Weighing Emergency Decree On Ebola

World Health Organization

Scrambling to catch up with the worst outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus, the World Health Organization announced Wednesday that it was considering the declaration of an international public health emergency and would convene a panel of experts in coming days to explore the use of experimental treatments for the incurable disease.

The announcements came as fears spread that a Saudi citizen may have brought the Ebola virus home to Saudi Arabia, which is still reeling from a mismanaged epidemic of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome that has killed nearly 300 people in the last two years. Saudi news media said that the citizen, a businessman in his 40s, died on Wednesday at King Fahd Hospital in Jidda after exhibiting Ebola-like symptoms, and that Saudi health officials had submitted biological samples from the patient to laboratories in the United States and Germany.

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Ebola Outbreak: Armed Men In Liberia ‘Poison’ Wells Killing Villagers Under Pretext Of Epidemic

Poison - Public Domain

Armed men have allegedly poisoned wells in Liberia’s New Georgia in order to kill the residents under the pretext of Ebola outbreak.

The water from the wells and pumps has been used by thousands of people in the area.

At least 16 people are suspected to be dead because of well-poisoning in the Margibi community.

It is still unclear what the exact motive of the culprits was. Witnesses have reported sighting armed men introducing suspected poisonous substances using syringes.

The villagers reported the incident to the police and investigators are said to be looking into the matter.

“Nobody is having exact information as to the diagnosis and everybody is confused. So the [well poisoning] incident that happened yesterday at the [New Georgia] junction is a wakeup call on the government, especially the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOH&SW), to test the water in every well,” Buston Kolliegbo, a resident, told the Daily Observer.

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Are U.S. Health Authorities Concealing True Number Of Suspected Ebola Victims From The Public?

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In an apparent attempt to avoid hysteria, U.S. health authorities are withholding details about a number of suspected Ebola victims from the public.

During a segment concerning the admission of a potential Ebola victim at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta revealed that there have been at least six cases at the hospital which prompted doctors to test for Ebola but that the details were not divulged publicly.

“There have been about a half a dozen patients who have had their blood tested because of concern, those particular patients their stories were not made public,” said Gupta, adding, “I’m not sure if that’s because of heightened concern by the hospital or what that means exactly.”

Gupta also appeared to suggest that patients being tested for the Ebola virus were not being kept in isolation when he stated, “This isn’t the kind of thing that they worry about spreading to other patients in the hospital, spreading to people who are walking around the hospital. This is not an airborne virus.”

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Ebola epidemic sparks panic in African nations

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The worst outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in history could actually be much worse than the official death toll reflects. Already, the World Health Organization says 887 people have died, but a top doctor working at the heart of the outbreak in West Africa says many cases are going unreported.

The senior doctor, who works for a leading medical organization in Liberia, explained to CBS News’ Debora Patta that what has helped set this outbreak apart from previous ones is the virus’ spread in urban areas.

One of the epicenters of the disease is the Liberian capital of Monrovia, home to about a million people, or almost a quarter of the country’s population.

The doctor, who spoke to CBS News on condition of confidentiality, said the disease is spinning out of control in Africa partly because it is extremely difficult to contain it in a sprawling, congested city center.

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Ebola terror in the UK as passenger collapses and dies getting off Sierra Leone flight

Plane Landing - Public Domain

Airport staff tonight told of their fears of an Ebola outbreak after a passenger from Sierra Leone collapsed and died as she got off a plane at Gatwick.

Workers said they were terrified the virus could spread globally through the busy international hub from the West African country which is in the grip of the deadly epidemic.

The woman, said to be 72, became ill on the gangway after she left a Gambia Bird jet with 128 passengers on board. She died in hospital on Saturday.

Ebola has killed 256 people in Sierra Leone. A total of 826 have died in West Africa since the outbreak began in February. Tests were carried out to see if the woman had disease.

The plane was quarantined as ­officials desperately tried to trace everyone who had been in contact with the woman.

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Obama Signs Executive Order to Allow Detention of Americans With ‘Respiratory Illnesses’

Obama Executive Order - Wikimedia Commons

As the Ebola outbreak continues to cause concern, President Barack Obama has signed an amendment to an executive order that would allow him to mandate the apprehension and detention of Americans who merely show signs of “respiratory illness.”

The executive order, titled Revised List of Quarantinable Communicable Diseases, amends executive order 13295, passed by George W. Bush in April 2003, which allows for the, “apprehension, detention, or conditional release of individuals to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of suspected communicable diseases.”

The amendment signed by Obama replaces subsection (b) of the original Bush executive order which referred only to SARS. Obama’s amendment allows for the detention of Americans who display, “Severe acute respiratory syndromes, which are diseases that are associated with fever and signs and symptoms of pneumonia or other respiratory illness, are capable of being transmitted from person to person, and that either are causing, or have the potential to cause, a pandemic, or, upon infection, are highly likely to cause mortality or serious morbidity if not properly controlled.”

Although Ebola was listed on the original executive order signed by Bush, Obama’s amendment ensures that Americans who merely show signs of respiratory illness, with the exception of influenza, can be forcibly detained by medical authorities.

Although the quarantining of people suspected of being infected with the Ebola virus seems like a perfectly logical move, the actual preconditions for this to happen aren’t restricted to just those suffering from the disease.

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Ebola pandemic warning: more than 100 health workers fighting Ebola have contracted the disease

Biohazard Warning - Public Domain

Something is different this time. This is the worst Ebola outbreak in recorded history, and this particular strain appears to be spreading much more easily than others have. So far, 1,323 people have been infected in the nations of Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. Of those 1,323 victims, a whopping 729 of them have died. But a number that is even more alarming was buried in the middle of a Reuters report on Friday. According to Reuters, “more than 100 health workers” that have been fighting Ebola in Africa have contracted the virus themselves. Considering the extraordinary measures that these health workers take to keep from getting the disease, that is quite chilling. We are not just talking about one or two “accidents”. We are talking about more than 100 of them getting sick. If Ebola is spreading this easily among medical professionals in biohazard body suits that keep any air from touching the skin, what chance are the rest of us going to have if this virus gets out into the general population?

In case you are tempted to think that this could not be possible and that I am just exaggerating, here is the relevant part of the Reuters article that I was talking about…

More than 100 health workers have been infected by the viral disease, which has no known cure, including two American medics working for charity Samaritan’s Purse. More than half of those have died, among them Sierra Leone’s leading doctor in the fight against Ebola, Sheik Umar Khan, a national hero.

This has the potential to be the greatest health crisis of our lifetimes.

But don’t just take my word for it. The following is what the head of the World Health Organization, Dr. Margaret Chan, just told the press about the disease

“If the situation continues to deteriorate, the consequences can be catastrophic in terms of lost lives but also severe socio-economic disruption and a high risk of spread to other countries.”

That certainly doesn’t sound good.

Remember, there is no vaccine for Ebola and there is no cure.

Most of the people that get it end up dying.

And right now even our most extreme containment procedures are failing to keep health workers from contracting the disease.

I put the following quote in an article the other day, but I think that it is worth repeating. The health professionals that are on the front lines of the Ebola fight in Africa are going to extraordinary lengths to keep from getting the virus…

To minimise the risk of infection they have to wear thick rubber boots that come up to their knees, an impermeable body suit, gloves, a face mask, a hood and goggles to ensure no air at all can touch their skin.

Dr Spencer, 27, and her colleagues lose up to five litres of sweat during a shift treating victims and have to spend two hours rehydrating afterwards.

They are only allowed to work for between four and six weeks in the field because the conditions are so gruelling.

At their camp they go through multiple decontaminations which includes spraying chlorine on their shoes.

But those precautions are not working.

More than 100 of them have already gotten sick.

So why is this happening?

Nobody seems to know.

Like I said, something is different this time.

A top Liberian health official has already stated that this outbreak is “above the control of the national government” and that it could easily develop into a “global pandemic”.

It is absolutely imperative that this disease be contained until experts can figure out why it seems to be spreading so much more easily than before.

But instead, health officials are beginning to ship Ebola patients all over the planet.

In fact, two American health workers that have contracted Ebola are being shipped to a hospital in Atlanta

Two American medical missionaries diagnosed with the deadly Ebola virus in Liberia could be back in the USA next week for treatment at a special medical isolation unit at Atlanta’s Emory University Hospital, the U.S. State Department said Friday.

The State Department did not name the two individuals, saying only that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was facilitating their transfer on a non-commercial flight and would “maintain strict isolation upon arrival in the United States.”

One is to arrive Monday in a small jet outfitted with a special, portable tent designed for transporting patients with highly infectious diseases. The second is to arrive a few days later, said doctors at Atlanta’s Emory University Hospital, where they will be treated.

Could this potentially spread the virus to our shores?

I am sure that they are taking as many precautions as they can.

However, even if those patients do not spread the disease to this country, the reality of the matter is that it will always be just a plane ride away. All it takes is for one person carrying the virus to get on one plane.

And if Ebola does start spreading in the United States, it could change life in this nation almost overnight.

We could very easily see forced quarantines and draconian restrictions on travel. For much more on this, please see my previous article entitled “This Is What Could Happen If Ebola Comes To The United States“.

Please share this article with as many people as you can. If more than 100 health workers fighting the virus have already contracted it, that means that it is already completely and totally out of control. If this virus does start spreading globally, it has the potential to kill millions of people. It could potentially be the greatest disaster that any of us have ever seen.

Let us hope and pray that it does not come to that. But these latest developments are more than just a little bit alarming.

(Originally posted at The American Dream)

American Ebola Patients On Way To Atlanta Hospital, Customs On Heightened Alert For Sick Passengers

Biohazard - Public Domain

Two American healthcare workers, described as in ‘grave condition and worsening’ are being infected by the Ebola virus are on their way to Atlanta’s Emory University Hospital for treatment. As WSBTV reports, the hospital has a separate isolation unit set up in partnership with the CDC to treat serious infectious diseases. CDC officials have called this “the biggest and most complex Ebola outbreak in history.” Sentiment across social media appears rather biased towards the negative on bringing the patients back. As we warned last night, there are significant implications should Ebola come to America. WE also note that while the CDC is not screening airline passengers, customs and border agents are on heightened alert for ‘people with flu-like symptoms.”

As WBSTV reports,

The hospital has a special isolation unit set up in collaboration with the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to treat patients with serious infectious diseases.

At least one of the two will be taken to a hospital at Emory University, near the headquarters of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, according to CNN.

A spokeswoman told Channel 2 Action News she did not know when the patients would arrive, but confirmed the patients are from west Africa. The Associated Press reported the patient is an American aid worker.

“It is physically separate from other patient areas and has unique equipment and infrastructure that provide an extraordinarily high level of clinical isolation,” a spokesman said in a release.

Sources told CNN the two Americans being evacuated are Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol. Both are described as being in grave condition but are stable after their health worsened overnight.  Both healthcare workers have been in Liberia with the faith-based charity Samaritan’s Purse.

The hospital said doctors, nurses and staff are trained in procedures to handle this type of patient.

The hospital is only one of four such facilities in the country.

“This is the biggest and most complex Ebola outbreak in history. Far too many lives have been lost already,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “It will take many months, and it won’t be easy, but Ebola can be stopped. We know what needs to be done. CDC is surging our response, sending 50 additional disease control experts to the region in the next 30 days.”

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An Ebola Patient Is Being Shipped To A Hospital In Atlanta

Emory_University_Hospital - Photo by Daniel Mayer

Emory University Hospital is expected to receive a patient infected with the deadly Ebola virus within the next several days, the university announced Thursday.

It’s unclear when exactly the patient will arrive, according to a statement from Emory. The Clifton Road hospital has a specially built isolation unit to treat patients exposed to certain serious infectious diseases. Set up in collaboration with the Atlanta-based U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the unit is physically separate from other patient areas and is one of only four such facilities in the country.

The Associated Press reported Thursday that the Ebola death toll passed 700 in West Africa as security forces went house-to-house in Sierra Leone’s capital looking for patients and others exposed to the disease.

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Ebola outbreak: World Health Organization launching $100M plan as death toll tops 700

World Health Organization

The World Health Organization is launching a $100 million response plan to combat an “unprecedented” outbreak of Ebola in West Africa that has killed 729 people out of 1,323 infected since February, the agency said on Thursday.

WHO Director-General Margaret Chan will meet in Conakry, Guinea on Friday with the presidents of affected West African nations, the United Nations health agency said in a statement.

“The scale of the Ebola outbreak, and the persistent threat it poses, requires WHO and Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone to take the response to a new level and this will require increased resources, in-country medical expertise, regional preparedness and coordination,” said Chan.

The plan identifies the need for “several hundred more personnel” to be deployed in affected countries to ease the strain on overstretched treatment facilities, the WHO said.

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This is the worst Ebola outbreak in history. Here’s why you should be concerned.

Ebola - Photo by Thomas W. Geisbert

It’s concentrated in three small West African states: Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea, where reports of Ebola infections first emerged in February. The outbreak has claimed more than 670 lives and, worryingly, infected medical personnel attempting to stop its spread. A prominent Liberian physician died Sunday.

What’s particularly scary, though, was the recent death of a Liberian man in Lagos, the bustling coastal mega-city in Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country. The man, a consultant for the Liberian government, had traveled from Liberia through an airport in Lome, the capital of Togo, before arriving in Nigeria. The hospital where he died is under lockdown, and the WHO has sent teams to Togo and Nigeria.

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Ebola is only a plane ride away from the United States

Plane Wing - Public Domain

The growing Ebola outbreak in West Africa serves as a grim reminder that deadly viruses are only a plane ride away from the USA, health experts say.

The outbreak is the largest and deadliest on record, with more than 670 deaths and more than 1,200 infections in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fatality rates for Ebola have been as high as 90% in past outbreaks, according to the World Health Organization.

The virus — which has an incubation period of a few days to three weeks — could easily travel to the USA through infected travelers, says Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota.

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A Second American Is Now Infected With Ebola

Biohazard - Public Domain

A second American aid worker in Liberia has tested positive for Ebola, according to the Christian humanitarian group she works for.

Nancy Writebol is employed by Serving in Mission, or SIM, in Liberia and was helping the joint SIM/Samaritan’s Purse team that is treating Ebola patients in Monrovia, according to a Samaritan’s Purse statement.

Writebol, who serves as SIM’s personnel coordinator, has been living in Monrovia with her husband, David, according to SIM’s website. The Charlotte, North Carolina, residents have been in Liberia since August 2013, according to the blog Writebols2Liberia. They have two adult children.

On Saturday, Samaritan’s Purse announced that American doctor Kent Brantly had become infected. The 33-year-old former Indianapolis resident had been treating Ebola patients in Monrovia and started feeling ill, spokeswoman Melissa Strickland said. Once he started noticing the symptoms last week, Brantly isolated himself.

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